Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

Synopsis

Global Media Studies explores the theoretical and methodological threats that are defining global media studies as a discipline.Emphasizing the connection of globalisation to local culture, this collection considers the diversity of modes of reception, reception contexts, uses of media content, and the performative and creative relationships that audiences develop with and through the media. Through ethnographic case studies from Brazil, Denmark, the UK, Japan, Lebanon, Mexico, South Africa, Turkey and the United States, the contributors address such questions as: what links media consumption to a lived global culture; what role cultural tradition plays globally in confronting transnational power; how global elements of mediated messages acquire class; and regional and local characteristics.

Excerpt

Istanbul has always determined the cultural agenda in Turkey. the country's print media, music and film industries have always been centered in Istanbul, a city which not only is located in the northwest or European side of Turkey, but also mimics, appropriates and borrows from the West. After the 1990s when the state monopoly in broadcasting was broken, Istanbul also commanded the broadcasting industry, with many new commercial broadcast networks airing throughout Anatolia, the Asian part of Turkey. Being from Istanbul and having witnessed this enthusiastically embraced change in the media environment, I was eager to see how these new stations and programs were experienced outside of Istanbul. Which national stations were Anatolian Turks listening to? What kind of programs did their local radio and television stations run? Were audiences also interacting with local radio personalities? What kind of music was preferred? What did people like best about the stations in their provinces? How were they experiencing and interpreting local media and Istanbul-based national networks in their daily lives? With these questions in mind and the belief that an ethnographic approach can best capture and respect the practices which people in different parts of the world invent in their everyday dealings with the changing media and cultural environment (Ang, 1990, p. 257), I decided to conduct media ethnography in Sanliurfa - a province in the underdeveloped southeast of Turkey along the Syrian border - to examine the role and meaning of these newly emerged commercial channels in the lives of Turkish audiences. I wanted to investigate how their media use intersects, contradicts or contests existing cultural practices and to map how local meanings and alternative responses are made within and against prevailing

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