Poverty and Social Exclusion in North and South: Essays on Social Policy and Global Poverty Reduction

Poverty and Social Exclusion in North and South: Essays on Social Policy and Global Poverty Reduction

Poverty and Social Exclusion in North and South: Essays on Social Policy and Global Poverty Reduction

Poverty and Social Exclusion in North and South: Essays on Social Policy and Global Poverty Reduction

Synopsis

In the last decade there has been a worrying increase in poverty in the industrialized countries of the "North" while the developing countries of the "South" have experienced some improvement. This collection argues that there are a number of likenesses between the predicaments of North and South and these warrant further analysis and investigation. Covering such themes as economic growth and social capital, food and poverty and debt versus equity in urban regeneration, this important will be of interest to students and academics involved with development economics as well as development studies.

Excerpt

This book began life as a set of papers presented to a one-day conference on poverty and social exclusion at Sorby Hall, University of Sheffield, on 9 April 2001. The conference was jointly convened by the Development Studies Association of UK - of which Paul Mosley was at the time President - and the Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) of the University of Sheffield. For the DSA, it was the second in a series of policy workshops designed to extend its reach into new constituencies and roles - and in particular into direct contact with practitioners, several of whom (Bennett, de Haan, Henderson, Holzmann, Markuš, Tate) are authors or co-authors of the papers presented here.

In particular, the workshop was conceived as a means of bringing together the development and social policy constituencies, and we hope that readers will feel that the distinctive approaches and languages of the two disciplines have been usefully blended in the selection that follows. The desirability of spelling out the analogies between processes of domestic and international income redistribution has been frequently stressed, notably in DFID's December 2000 White Paper on Making Globalisation Work for the Poor, and this book can be seen as a set of reflections, mediating and some-times debating between development and social policy approaches, on when and whether and for whose benefit processes of globalisation can indeed be influenced in a positive way.

We would like to thank all those who took part in the workshop for mak-ing it a success. Especial thanks go to the Director of PERC, Andrew Gamble, and the Vice-Chancellor of Sheffield University, Professor Bob Boucher, for giving the event their enthusiastic support; to the conference administrators, Patricia Anderson and Sylvia McColm; affectionately to Sarah Tate for assist-ance with the planning of the conference and for many conversations about development and social administration; and to Robert Langham and Terry Clague at Routledge for their continuing and patient support.

The publishers and editors would also like to thank Blackwell Publishing for their permission to reprint Paul Whiteley's chapter, which first appeared in Political Studies, Volume 48, June 2000.

Paul Mosley

Elizabeth Dowler . . .

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