Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema

Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema

Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema

Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema

Synopsis

In Bollywood , anthropologist and film scholar Tejaswini Ganti provides a guide to the cultural, social and political significance of Hindi cinema, outlining the history and structure of the Bombay film industry, and the development of popular Hindi filmmaking since the 1930s.'Bollywood' is the dominant global term to refer to the prolific Hindi language film industry in Bombay (renamed Mumbai in 1995). Characterised by music, dance routines, melodrama, lavish production values and an emphasis on stars and spectacle, Bollywood films have met with box-office success and enthusiastic audiences from India to West Africa to Russia, and throughout the English-speaking world.Providing information and commentary on the key players in Bollywood, including composers, directors and stars, as well as material from current filmmakers themselves, the areas covered in Bollywood include:* history of Indian cinema* main themes and characteristics of Hindi cinema* significant films, directors and stars* production and distribution of Bollywood films* interviews with actors, directors and screenwriters.

Excerpt

"Okay, five-six-seven-eight!" a woman shouts into a microphone and blows a whistle to signal to the sound engineer on the other side of the room. As soon as the music begins, a man in a white chef's uniform starts dancing and juggling vegetables, while long-legged waitresses in black T-shirts, miniskirts, and white aprons pass behind him. Once the song starts, the man begins to mouth the words so perfectly that he appears to be singing it himself. Men crouching toward the ground slowly push a trolley with the cameraman and movie camera toward the performer. With a sound of the whistle, and a "Cut it!". the music stops, as does the action. The woman goes over to the man in the chef's outfit and demonstrates a few dance steps. After watching her, the man mimicks her exact movements. "Okay, one more rehearsal, and then we'll do a take." The woman blows the whistle and the whole sequence starts all over again.

The above scene is not the shooting of a television commercial or a music video in New York or Los Angeles, but the shooting of a song sequence for a Hindi film in Bombay, better known as a "Bollywood" film. From Baz Luhrmann to Andrew Lloyd Webber, from Channel Four to Turner Classic Movies, from Macy's to

INTRODUCTION

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.