Ten Rungs: Collected Hasidic Sayings

Ten Rungs: Collected Hasidic Sayings

Ten Rungs: Collected Hasidic Sayings

Ten Rungs: Collected Hasidic Sayings

Synopsis

The sacred tales and aphorisms collected here by Martin Buber have their origins in the traditional Hasidic metaphor of life as a ladder, reaching towards the divine by ascending rungs of perfection. Through Biblical riddles and interpretations, Jewish proverbs and spiritual meditations, they seek to awaken in the reader a full awareness of the urgency of the human condition, and of the great need for self-recognition and spiritual renewal.

Excerpt

They asked the "holy Yehudi": "Why is it written: 'Justice, justice, shalt thou follow' [Deut 16:20]? Why is the word 'justice' repeated?"

He answered: "We ought to follow justice with justice, and not with unrighteousness." That means: the use of unrighteousness as a means to a righteous end makes the end itself unrighteous; injustice as a means to justice renders justice unjust.

What knowledge could be of greater importance to the men of our age, and to the various communities of our time? the saying sounds as if it were derived from the experiences of contemporaries. and yet it stems from the Napoleonic era, and was not spoken at the hub of events, but in a Polish ghetto, and by a zaddik, a "righteous man," who was a leader of hasidim, those "devout" souls who knew that no one can be really devout in relation to God, if he is not devout toward

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