Strategic Direction and Development of the School: Key Frameworks for School Improvement Planning

Strategic Direction and Development of the School: Key Frameworks for School Improvement Planning

Strategic Direction and Development of the School: Key Frameworks for School Improvement Planning

Strategic Direction and Development of the School: Key Frameworks for School Improvement Planning

Synopsis

Schools will not be able to continue to improve unless they move away from an over-concentration on the short-term and focus on the strategic nature of planning and development. The more targets, the less the effects - what we need is strategy and sustainability. This book links school improvement planning and strategic development for leadership enhancement as well as for management accountability.Short-term planning, in the form of target-setting plans aimed at improving standards, has gained increasing importance. While the book agrees that this is necessary, it puts forward the view that short-term planning is not sufficient for the longer-term development of the school. Sustainability and strategic development are of critical importance and for these the authors believe that a more holistic approach to planning is necessary. To that end, this book links short and longer-term planning in a framework, which supports the strategic development of the school.The authors are national experts in the field and in preparing this text have worked extensively with headteachers, deputy headteachers, governors and those participating in NPQH and masters programmes in educational leadership and management.

Excerpt

Professor David Hopkins

During the past fifteen years, development planning has established itself as a key strategy for school improvement. In England in 1989 when the then DES issued its first advice, development planning was regarded as a means of helping schools manage the extensive national reform agenda, and to enable the school 'to organise what it is already doing and what it needs to do in a more purposeful and coherent way'. Given the amount of change schools and teachers were expected to cope with in the late 1980s and early 1990s such a strategy was widely welcomed.

This is not to say that development planning is a panacea. As an approach to school improvement, development planning has attracted its fair share of critics. Some have been concerned about its apparently bureaucratic and prescriptive character; its tendency to distort the nature of educational change and its 'hyper-rationality'; its lack of a management and strategic dimension; and its inappropriateness to some school settings and certain types of change imperatives. I have some sympathy with these concerns and was pleased that in their first edition of Strategic Direction and Development of the School, Brent Davies and Linda Ellison adroitly managed to articulate an approach to school development that avoided these pitfalls. In so doing they produced a book that spoke directly to the strategic needs of school leaders at a time when the reform agenda in England was characterised by what some have termed 'informed prescription'.

The new edition of the book comes at a similarly opportune time. 'Informed prescription' was an important and necessary stage in a long-term, large-scale reform effort, but such centralised reform strategies have difficulty in delivering the confidence, innovation and creativity that are so necessary for the knowledge society. The phase of reform we are entering will obviously still require some elements

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.