Managing Teaching Assistants: A Guide for Headteachers, Managers, and Teachers

Managing Teaching Assistants: A Guide for Headteachers, Managers, and Teachers

Managing Teaching Assistants: A Guide for Headteachers, Managers, and Teachers

Managing Teaching Assistants: A Guide for Headteachers, Managers, and Teachers

Synopsis

Thisnbsp;is a practical guide to the role, management, and deployment of teaching assistants. It offers comprehensive and informed support, underpinned by illustrative case studies throughout. Information and practical guidance is given on: *nbsp;the role and competencies of teaching assistants * how to audit the existing teaching assistant provision in the school * the teaching assistant's role in planning, delivery and feedback * how to appoint, induct, mentor and appraise teaching assistants * the effective management of teaching assistants by teachers and managers, and the need for a whole school approach * opportunities for continual professional development for teaching assistants. This book is based on extensive observation of teaching assistants working in schools, and will have practical significance and implications for headteachers, senior management staff, teachers, LEA advisors, trainers and consultants.

Excerpt

In starting to run courses for teaching assistants (TAs) and give advice to schools as a newly appointed consultant to the local education authority (LEA) in 1994, I needed to find out what TAs really did. I knew, from my experience of TAs in the schools where I had worked for nine years as a primary and nursery teacher and twelve years as a headteacher of two schools, that TAs no longer just supported the work of teachers, or the environment of the classroom, but were also increasingly working directly with children and young people. I decided to undertake some research of my own, encouraged by both my line manager and my future research supervisor. While still a consultant, later an adviser and senior adviser in the lea, I undertook a survey of provision in the county and some in-depth case study research in two primary schools. I kept a diary, or more correctly a file of jottings, notes, reflections and evaluations over the late 1990s, and delved into the literature. I worked closely with over fifty schools for several years, and must have visited over two hundred more in various capacities as an inspector, adviser, tutor, facilitator and friend. Much of this book is based on my findings and experiences in my own schools and the many others I had the privilege to visit. the research material is scattered through the book in separate frames and shaded. My findings are backed by an increasing level of published work from others.

When I retired in 2000, my knowledge and understanding were used by the then Department for Education and Employment (DfEE) ta team to help in the preparation and delivery of ta induction materials in England. This meant I was able to meet, share ideas and attempt to understand a wide perspective of views and experiences of TAs across the country. in 2001, I was able to share the picture found in England with our European colleagues at a human resource conference in Barcelona. It was interesting to find how advanced the uk is, in having tapped this wonderful resource.

It is my hope that sharing my experiences, findings and ideas with a wider audience will enable the varied expertise of TAs to be understood and utilised to its maximum potential. in doing so, I hope also to celebrate the achievements of TAs to date, hoping for their recognition as a profession in their

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