State Collaboration and Development Strategies in China: The Case of the China-Singapore Suzhou Industrial Park (1992-2002)

State Collaboration and Development Strategies in China: The Case of the China-Singapore Suzhou Industrial Park (1992-2002)

State Collaboration and Development Strategies in China: The Case of the China-Singapore Suzhou Industrial Park (1992-2002)

State Collaboration and Development Strategies in China: The Case of the China-Singapore Suzhou Industrial Park (1992-2002)

Synopsis

This book looks at Singapore and China to examine governmental collaboration on a foreign direct investment oriented strategy. Focusing on the unique collaborative venture, the Suzhou Industrial Park project, the author explores the economic, political and social relationships between Singapore and China throughout the course of the scheme.

Excerpt

On 26 February 1994, China's Vice Premier Li Lanqing and Singapore's Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew signed an agreement for the two governments to jointly develop a Special Economic Zone in the city of Suzhou. The China-Singapore Suzhou Industrial Park, as the zone came to be known, was described by the two governments '… as a new model of economic and technological cooperation' (China Daily 28 February 1994). According to Singapore's Deputy Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, who wrote:

The [Suzhou Industrial Park] project was mooted because the Chinese government was studying models of rapid economic growth while maintaining good social order. Singapore agreed to jointly participate with China in the challenging task of creating a modern industrial township in Suzhou. The significance of SIP was not just to be another industrial park in China, but to be the vehicle for transferring the software of economic development and management for testing out, adapting and applying Singaporean methods of economic management in China.

(Singapore Software Project Office 2001: i)

The economic cooperation took the form of a commercial joint venture, where both governments hoped to mutually benefit from attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) to the zone. The technological cooperation would take the form of a 'software transfer' programme, where the Singapore government would impart its experience in industrial development and administration to the China government. The collaborating governments believed that a Special Economic Zone in China that had Singaporean characteristics would

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