Migration, Education, and Change

Migration, Education, and Change

Migration, Education, and Change

Migration, Education, and Change

Synopsis

The diverse contributions in this book discuss both the classical and the more recent forms of migration. Illustrating the developments in various European countries and Australia as a 'classical immigration state', they tackle these different forms of migration and investigate their divergent educational implications regarding identity, citizenship and language education. This book will be of essential interest for students and researchers interested in the current discourse on multicultural education.

Excerpt

Migration within and across nation states is a worldwide phenomenon. The movement of peoples across national boundaries is as old as the nation state itself - as the chapters in this book make clear. However, never before in the history of world migration has the movement of diverse racial, cultural, ethnic, religious and language groups within and across nation states been as numerous and rapid or raised such complex and difficult questions about citizenship, human rights, democracy and education. Many worldwide trends and developments are challenging the notion of educating students to function in one nation state. They include the ways in which people are moving back and forth across national borders, the rights of movement permitted by the European Union, and the rights codified in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Prior to the ethnic revitalization movements of the 1960s and 1970s, the aim of schools in most nation states was to develop citizens who internalized their national values, venerated their national heroes, and accepted glorified versions of their national histories. These goals of citizenship education are obsolete today because many people have multiple national commitments and live in multiple nation states. However, the development of citizens who have global and cosmopolitan identities and commitments is contested in nation states throughout the world because nationalism remains strong. Nationalism and globalization coexist in tension worldwide.

The chapters in this book describe the complex educational issues with which nation states in Europe must deal when trying to respond to the problems wrought by international migration in ways consistent with their democratic ideologies and declarations. As Tomlinson points out (Chapter 5) when discussing the schooling of non-White ethnic groups in Britain - and other authors note when describing the education of minority groups in other European nations - there is a wide gap between the democratic ideals in European nations and the daily educational experiences of minority groups in their schools. Ethnic minority students in Europe, as in other nations throughout the world, often experience

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