Kwame Nkrumah's Contribution to Pan-Africanism: An Afrocentric Analysis

Kwame Nkrumah's Contribution to Pan-Africanism: An Afrocentric Analysis

Kwame Nkrumah's Contribution to Pan-Africanism: An Afrocentric Analysis

Kwame Nkrumah's Contribution to Pan-Africanism: An Afrocentric Analysis

Synopsis

This study analyzes contributions made by Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972) to the development of Pan-African agency from the 1945 Pan-African Congress in Manchester to the military coup d'etat of Nkrumah's government in February 1966.

Excerpt

The Afrocentric approach to African Area Studies and African American Studies is a relatively new and budding endeavor. It differs from other academic disciplines by concerning itself with the empowerment of Africans. Units of analysis inherited from other disciplines, however, have restricted its approach. Most of the resultant theories focus on individuals and diasporic elements. Within Africa, these scholars recognize only ethnic and linguistic groups while they attack a continental-wide African identity as being pejoratively essentialist. These models, therefore, have not satisfactorily addressed the question of African agency at macro levels.

This new approach requires agential models at the level of African nation states and the 'African world.' The life and works of Kwame Nkrumah, including the ideology of Nkrumahism, offers a set of analytical and coherency tools with which to build an African-centered base in the study of international politics. Indeed, Nkrumah offers a revolutionary model of Pan-Africanism to the explication of African Personality studies. Nkrumahism stands as the intellectual progeny of Garveyism and the earlier works of Blyden.

The life and works of Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972), the most influential agent of African liberation and organizational unity since Marcus Garvey (1887-1940), provide a useful ideological foundation and strategic models for agency to the construction of African Centered curriculums. He personally influenced and was impacted by an impressive number of anti-imperialists (some of which were Pan-African nationalists ) in West Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa, Central Africa, North Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, and the United States of America. Most notable among these were W.E.B. DuBois (1868-1963), Amy Ashwood Garvey (1897-1969), Shirley DuBois (1906-1977), George Padmore (1902-1959), Ras T. Makonnen, Jomo Kenyatta (1894-1978), Tom Mboya (1930-1969), Milton Obote (b. 1924), Abd-el Nasser (1918-1970), Julius Nyerere

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