Depression: The Way out of Your Prison

Depression: The Way out of Your Prison

Depression: The Way out of Your Prison

Depression: The Way out of Your Prison

Synopsis

'This book has saved my life', say thousands of people who have changed their lives forever after reading Depression: The Way Out of Your Prison over the past decade.Depression is the experience of a terrible isolation, of being alone in a prison. But by understanding how we build the prison of depression we can dismantle it forever. Dorothy Rowe gives us a way of understanding depression, allowing us to take charge of our lives. She shows it is not an illness requiring drugs but a defence we use to hold ourselves together when we feel our lives falling apart.This completely updated second edition takes account of recent changes in the NHS and includes information on services available for non-British readers. Those buying a further copy of this popular book will be interested to see new case histories alongside news about some of the people mentioned in the first edition.Author of ten bestsellers on life and its problems, Dorothy Rowe is a clinical psychologist who now devotes her time to research, writing and teaching. Her work is read across the world in fourteen different languages and she is a sought-after speaker and commentator on depression and a wide range of psychological conditions.

Excerpt

Depression is as old as the human race, and rare is the person who has not felt its touch. Sometimes, suddenly, without apparent reason we feel unbearably sad. The world turns grey, and we taste a bitterness in our mouth. We hear an echo of the bell that tolls our passing, and we reach out for a comforting hand, but find ourselves alone. For some of us this experience is no more than a fleeting moment, or something we can dispel with common-sense thoughts and practical actions. But for some of us this experience becomes a ghost whose unbidden presence mars every feast, or, worse, a prison whose walls, though invisible, are quite impenetrable.

Depression, in this century, [the twentieth] has been called an illness and treated with pills and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Some people are greatly helped by this treatment. Their depression vanishes, never to return. However, for some people, pills and ECT bring only temporary relief or no change at all. For these people something more is needed, and this is not surprising, since being depressed is something more than being ill.

If we have measles or a broken leg, we may feel miserable and inconvenienced, but, unless we feel we are so ill that we might die, we do not spend our time worrying about our sins, or contemplating the futility of existence. Yet if we are depressed this is what we do. In our own way and in our own terms we think about, agonise about, the issues of life and death-which are about what purpose life has, what faith we can live by, whether our life ends in death or whether something lies beyond death, what we have done and our feelings

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