Key Papers from the Journal of Child Psychotherapy

Key Papers from the Journal of Child Psychotherapy

Key Papers from the Journal of Child Psychotherapy

Key Papers from the Journal of Child Psychotherapy

Synopsis

Provides access to classic and important papers from this prestigious journal, spanning the whole period from the beginning of publication to the present.

Excerpt

I remember the excitement with which my fellow trainees and I in the late 1960s and early 1970s opened each issue of what was then, as Paul Barrows writes, a small in-house journal. Many of the papers were written by our teachers, who had themselves been among the first students at our training school. They conveyed the sense that fundamental issues related to the practice of child psychotherapy were being thought through for the first time. Successive editors welcomed contributions from all members of the profession, making us feel that we were part of a pioneering scientific venture. Today, the much-expanded Journal of Child Psychotherapy occupies a pre-eminent position in the field, is expertly produced by Taylor & Francis, and is available on-line; but the papers published in it still convey a pioneering spirit and the passion which the authors bring to their work.

Reading the papers collected in this volume gives the reader a sense of the intellectual roots of the profession. Some of the theoretical and practical issues addressed remain fully relevant today. Others repay thinking through again in the context of changed circumstances, new findings or fresh points of view. the section on applied work is particularly topical in the context of current debates in the public sector.

Inevitably, as Barrows indicates, readers may find that particular favourites have had to be omitted. Many Freudian and Jungian contributions were published in other journals, including Kut Rosenfeld and Sprince's pioneering work on borderline children. Constraints on space meant leaving out papers by Martha Harris and Frances Tustin which did first appear in the Journal of Child Psychotherapy. Barrows notes that Tustin's contribution was unique in leading to developments in the psychoanalysis of adults, whereas more generally child psychotherapists have been influenced by psychoanalytic theories derived from the treatment of adult patients. Although her books are readily available, her papers in the Journal contributed to its characteristic atmosphere. I hope that this volume may be followed by another including some of these papers and providing a picture of the Journal under later editors, including the time of Barrows' own editorship together with Hamish Canham.

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