Visual Consumption

Visual Consumption

Visual Consumption

Visual Consumption

Synopsis

A key characteristic of the twenty-first century economy is 'the image'. Brand development is based on image, products are advertised via images, and corporate image is critical for economic success. This book draws from art history, photography and visual studies to develop an interdisciplinary, image-based approach to understanding consumer behaviour.Focusing on four themes: representation, photography, images and identity, it presents a theoretical perspective on visual consumption, providing wide-ranging examples from advertising, the internet, photography, design, theatre and tourism, and discusses the importance of the internet in bringing visual issues into the mainstream of strategic thinking; spurring research into perception of visual displays.Incorporating case studies from the US, Europe and the UK, this book provides an unparalleled guide to the visual consumption processes necessary for understanding and succeeding in today's market.

Excerpt

My first professional presentation was at the Association for Consumer Research conference in Honolulu, Hawaii. I was nervous and excited - the conference locale made quite an introduction to the conference circuit. As I struggled over my presentation, producing several versions of my talk, poring over my overheads to get them just right, I wondered who I would be speaking to - my first audience. On the day of my talk, I eagerly headed down to the room to get ready for my debut. a few of the other presenters were there, but by the time the session was scheduled to begin, the room was fairly empty - there seemed to be more presenters than audience members. “Where is everyone?” I asked my advisor. “Out sightseeing, ” he replied, with a knowing grin. Perhaps it was then that I learned the power of visual attractions - my talk went fine, but I learned that places like Hawaii often make poor sites for an academic conference - there are too many sights outside the conference hotel that lure colleagues away from intellectual discourse. That day, at least, visual consumption handily beat out theoretical speculations about consumer behavior.

As I was completing this book, I traveled to the Swedish island of Gotland, 50 miles out into the Baltic Sea. Gotland was a medieval seat of the Hanseatic League, a historical precursor to the current European Union. There, in the museum, I saw dozens of “picture stones” - huge stones engraved with pictures and runic inscriptions from previous civilizations. the stones were interesting, but the images meant little to me on first seeing them. I traveled around the island for awhile, and happened to meet someone whose father studied the picture stones, which were created over a span of about a thousand years, including the Viking age. She arranged for me to meet her father, a retired professor of archeology at Uppsala University, in the same museum that I first encountered the picture stones. During his illuminating lecture, he carefully laid out the history of picture stones - which provide compelling evidence of Scandinavian culture via their representation of mythical figures, boats, animals, and people. He told me about the Roman influence on picture stones, their role in Viking culture, and their importance as an artistic form unique to Gotland. I began to see the stones differently. They began to speak to me

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.