Education for Citizenship: Ideas into Action: A Practical Guide for Teachers of Pupils Aged 7-14

Education for Citizenship: Ideas into Action: A Practical Guide for Teachers of Pupils Aged 7-14

Education for Citizenship: Ideas into Action: A Practical Guide for Teachers of Pupils Aged 7-14

Education for Citizenship: Ideas into Action: A Practical Guide for Teachers of Pupils Aged 7-14

Synopsis

This clear and user-friendly text provides practical guidance on how to incorporate citizenship into the curriculum. It offers a wealth of teaching aids including: * tried-and-tested photocopiable materials * case studies * suggested teaching strategies * comprehensive reference and resource section. Nick Clough and Cathie Holden are fully experienced in the field having both taught in primary and middle schools and both now specialise in providing citizenship education courses for trainee teachers and practising teachers. This up-to-date book will help engage those teaching (and studying) the new requirement of Education for Citizenship at Key Stages 2 and 3, and along with lively examples of pupils' work and discussions of the changes to the QCA guidelines regarding citizenship, they provide a comprehensive and complete resource. It is also of immense value to curriculum coordinators and to those wishing to know more about the thinking behind education for citizenship.

Excerpt

Democracy is best learned in a democratic setting where participation is encouraged, where views can be expressed openly and discussed, where there is freedom of expression for pupils and teachers, and where there is fairness and justice. (Council of Europe 1985)

Our [school] parliament is more controlled than the real one. (Boy, aged 11)

It is often maintained that schools are mini-societies that reflect the world at large and that learning to live in these will prepare children for adult life. On this premise many schools have established school councils, where representatives from each class come together in a council of students, teachers and others involved in the running of the school. Some schools have opted for school parliaments, and others have peer mediation schemes where students are responsible for helping their peers find their own solutions to problems (often in the playground). Behind all these schemes lies a belief in students having a right to voice their opinions and to be actively involved in the school community.

Key issues

Voice and agency

How can we give all students a 'voice'? How can we give them a sense of 'agency', of their own ability to achieve change? How can we make schools a more equitable place? Will more power for students mean less power for teachers? Will it help raise standards?

Democratic processes

How can we model democratic processes in school? Is it possible for students to learn about negotiation, debate and compromise by taking part in the running

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