Issues in Science Teaching

Issues in Science Teaching

Issues in Science Teaching

Issues in Science Teaching

Synopsis

Issues in Science Teaching covers a wide range of important issues which will interest teachers at all phases in the education system. The issues discussed include: *the nature and purposes of science education in a multicultural society, including the idea of science for all *the role and purposes of investigational work in science education *assessment, curriculum progression and pupil attitudes to their science experience *supporting basic skills development in literacy, numeracy and ICT, through science teaching *supporting cross-curricular work through science teaching *taking account of individual differences including ability, special needs, learning style and the case for inclusion The articles are strongly based on current research and are intended to stimulate and broaden debate among the readers. Written by practising science educators and teachers, this book offers new and interesting ways of developing science education at all levels.

Excerpt

This book, Issues in Science Teaching, is one of a series of books entitled Issues in Subject Teaching. The series has been designed to engage with a wide range of issues related to subject teaching. Types of issues vary among subjects, but may include, for example: issues that impact on Initial Teacher Education in the subject; issues addressed in the classroom through the teaching of the subject; issues to do with the content of the subject and its definition; issues to do with subject pedagogy; issues to do with the relationship between the subject and broader educational aims and objectives in society, and the philosophy and sociology of education; and issues to do with the development of the subject and its future in the twenty-first century.

Each book consequently presents key debates that subject teachers will need to understand, reflect on and engage in as part of their professional development. Chapters have been designed to highlight major questions, to consider the evidence from research and practice and to arrive at possible answers. Some subject books or chapters offer at least one solution or a view of the ways forward, whereas others provide alternative views and leave readers to identify their own solution or view of the ways forward. The editors expect readers of the series to want to pursue the issues raised, and so chapters include suggestions for further reading, and questions for further debate. The chapters and questions could be used as stimuli for debate in subject seminars or department meetings, or as topics for assignments or classroom research. The books are targeted at all those with a professional interest in the subject, and in particular: student teachers learning to teach the subject in the primary or secondary school; newly qualified teachers; teachers with a subject co-ordination or leadership role, and those preparing for such responsibility; mentors, tutors, trainers and advisers of the groups mentioned above.

Each book in the series has a cross-phase dimension. This is because the editors believe it is important for teachers in the primary and secondary phases to look at subject teaching holistically, particularly in order to provide for continuity and progression, but also to increase their understanding of how children learn. The balance of chapters that have a cross-phase relevance, chapters that focus on issues which are of particular concern to primary teachers and chapters that focus on issues which secondary teachers are more likely to need to address, varies according to the issues relevant to different subjects. However, no matter where the emphasis

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