Chinese-Japanese Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Complementarity and Conflict

Chinese-Japanese Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Complementarity and Conflict

Chinese-Japanese Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Complementarity and Conflict

Chinese-Japanese Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Complementarity and Conflict

Synopsis

In this analysis of China's relationship with Japan a group of international contributors address a range of core issues including: strategic concerns, security, Taiwan, diplomacy, economic relations, trade, the role of business and currency.

Excerpt

The relationship between East Asia's two giant powers, China and Japan, has always been and will always be crucial for understanding the development of Asia. the relationship has undergone considerable changes since the end of the Cold War but what we learn about it is often fragmented into different disciplines or knowledge of specific incidents.

With this background, the European Institute of Japanese Studies at Stockholm School of Economics joined forces with the Swedish Institute of International Studies to organise a cross-disciplinary international workshop about the Chinese-Japanese relationship in the first year of the new millennium. We had not anticipated the great interest in this topic and were overwhelmed by the number of scholars from all over the world who were eager to come all the way to another corner of the globe, northern Europe, to present and discuss their research on this topic. We had to make a strict selection between interested applicants, and finally twenty-five scholars from Asia, the Pacific, North America and Europe met in Stockholm in late August 2000. For three very intense days we listened to presentations and discussed the Chinese-Japanese relationship from a number of different angles.

This book is basically built on a selection of the papers presented at the workshop, incorporating into the original versions the comments we made and the discussions we had during the workshop. Where the contents of different papers overlapped, they have been merged. There were many other equally good papers, which we would have liked to be able to include in this volume but were forced to leave out for reasons of space and slightly differing focus. It is our aspiration that this volume will reflect the interesting discussions we had at the workshop and the many angles and views that must be taken into account in an assessment of the Chinese-Japanese relationship and where it is heading.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the Japan Foundation as well as the Swedish Institute for the Internationalisation of Higher Education and Research (STINT) for their generous economic support that made this workshop possible. Special thanks go to Ambassador Börje Ljunggren, Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, for his opening remarks, to Linus Hagström, Ph.D. candidate, for academic input and contact making, and Marie Tsujita

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