New Feminist Stories of Child Sexual Abuse: Sexual Scripts and Dangerous Dialogues

New Feminist Stories of Child Sexual Abuse: Sexual Scripts and Dangerous Dialogues

New Feminist Stories of Child Sexual Abuse: Sexual Scripts and Dangerous Dialogues

New Feminist Stories of Child Sexual Abuse: Sexual Scripts and Dangerous Dialogues

Synopsis

The international feminist contributors to this book look through the lens of poststructuralism at how child sexual abuse is differently represented and understood in the populist, academic, clinical, media and legal contexts.

Excerpt

Paula Reavey and Sam Warner

This book is about women and child sexual abuse. It is about the ways in which women and child sexual abuse are talked about, how their relationship is understood and the multiple practices this gives rise to. This book is also about dismantling taken-for-granted truths. It is about daring to ask questions concerning the constructed nature of child sexual abuse; how it is produced, rather than merely represented in the ways in which we speak about it (Reavey and Warner, 2001). In this book we demonstrate that child sexual abuse is never transparent in terms of what it means: either as an event itself or in the memory of it. It is something that, as survivors, theoreticians or practitioners, we make sense of in the re-telling, and how we make sense of it shifts according to the contexts in which we speak, with whom we speak with, and who we speak about. It shapes the ways we see ourselves, the way we view others and it structures what we decide our actions around child sexual abuse should be. As such, we argue that child sexual abuse is a matter of translation, debate and politics, and not simply a taken-for-granted fact. Our aim is to enter the debate in order to untangle some of the complex ways we translate stories of child sexual abuse through, and into, personal and social politics. This book, then, provides a sustained and critical engagement with those stories of child sexual abuse that shape our sense of reality and the actions these give rise to.

Sexual scripts and feminist politics: social economies of women and child sexual abuse

It is self-evident that child sexual abuse takes place in a socio-cultural setting (Hacking, 1995), wherein concepts such as 'truth' (about who is guilty or innocent and the aftermath of abuse) are subject to a wide range of interpretations. As argued, this is dependent on who is doing the speaking and the position she (or he) is speaking from. Is the speaker invested with authority and expertise, and by what means is this authority and expertise warranted? In order to elaborate how authority is conferred, and which understandings are most readily accepted, we need to directly

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.