Managing Projects in Health and Social Care

Managing Projects in Health and Social Care

Managing Projects in Health and Social Care

Managing Projects in Health and Social Care

Synopsis

Anyone who is a manager or professional leader can expect to have to lead projects that contribute to service development and service improvement. This text looks at the subject of change which is a normal part of working life in public services.

Excerpt

This book will provide you with a practical approach to managing a project in a health or care setting. People who have leadership or functional responsibilities are increasingly expected to manage projects as part of their day-to-day work. Few receive special training to help them to take on this task, although it is very different from professional, clinical or functional roles in health and social care. If you are one of these people, help is at hand!

This book provides a practical introduction to management of projects and will be a useful handbook for help in any future projects you find yourself invited to manage. It focuses on projects that might be carried out by team leaders, and first-line and operational managers, but will also be attractive to more senior people who are managing projects for the first time. Each chapter discusses an aspect of project management and illustrates the discussion with examples drawn from health and care settings. Techniques are described and applied to examples and there are activities to encourage you to try out different approaches. Further references are provided for those managing larger or more substantial and long-term projects. There are also references to sources of information about leadership, consultative management style, 'change-management' approaches and influencing skills, without which the management of any project can run into difficulties.

Projects are usually intended to contribute to development and change within an organisation or service area. The context of health and social care is complex, with many different interests to consider. The patients or users of health and social care services are often vulnerable during their contact with the service and change can be disruptive to service users and to staff. It is important that projects improve the service without reducing the quality offered to service users or putting additional strain on staff who already work within limited resources. Successful management of a project is quite a balancing act and can only be learnt through experience and reflection on experience, supported by thoughtful consideration of the ideas, processes and techniques that have become recognised as the expertise of project management. . .

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