Early Modern European Society

Early Modern European Society

Early Modern European Society

Early Modern European Society

Synopsis

Following the success of his earlier works, The Iron Century (1971) and European Society 1500-1700 (1984), Henry Kamen here presents a significant and enthralling study of the sweeping changes affecting Europe from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century - a time when the concept of Europe was a nebulous idea.He draws together common features of society from a range of different social contexts throughout Europe, from Italy and Spain to Poland and Russia. The two central themes of basic social structures of Europe and change in social attitudes are examined here as well as the significance of broad community based norms and the development of social disciplines at all levels.Amongst many others, topics of discussion include:* European identities, frontiers and language* Leisure, work and migration* Religion, ritual and withcraft* The aristocracy, the bourgeoisie and the poor* gender roles* social discipline and absolutism.Students of early modern history will find this book fascinating and an invaluable addition to their course studies.

Excerpt

The central theme of this book is the study of changes within European society over a period of well over two centuries, from the end of the fifteenth to the early decades of the eighteenth century. There was of course no such thing as an autonomous 'European society'; my survey considers, rather, some common features observed from a range of different contexts within the European area, and offers signposts to understanding how some linkages functioned in traditional society. Two main perspectives are considered: basic social structures of Europe over the period, and aspects of change in social attitudes. At the same time two simple themes have been pursued, within a broad political context: the significance of broad community-based norms, and the development of social discipline at all levels. the substantial differences between northwest, south and eastern Europe are respected, but integrated into a general view. the coverage, inevitably, is both selective and simplified, but what this book offers is a broad-based perspective of one of the most formative epochs of European history.

An early and very different version of the study, centred mainly on economic history, was published in 1971 as The Iron Century. Its success led, just over ten years later, to the issue of a revised version under the title European Society. in the quarter-century since the book first appeared, an enormous amount of first-rate research has opened up perspectives in all branches of historical scholarship. To assimilate this new work adequately would have called for an entirely different type of volume. Though I have preserved the general approach of the previous study, it should be emphasised that this is a completely revised and substantially new book, in which economic history has been restricted to a secondary role. Some endnotes have been given in order to indicate controversial or recent sources of information; but the very large amount of references in the text has made it impractical to include notes for all sources or quotations.

No single volume like this can do justice to the many stimulating perspectives of early modern civilisation, or to the many excellent books that have been produced recently by scholars of many countries. Nor has it been possible from my outpost in the Mediterranean to gain access to all the studies that I would

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.