Communicating Ideas with Film, Video, and Multimedia: A Practical Guide to Information Motion-Media

Communicating Ideas with Film, Video, and Multimedia: A Practical Guide to Information Motion-Media

Communicating Ideas with Film, Video, and Multimedia: A Practical Guide to Information Motion-Media

Communicating Ideas with Film, Video, and Multimedia: A Practical Guide to Information Motion-Media

Synopsis

Written for a broad audience of professional informational and corporate filmmakers, film students, technical writers, and clients, Communicating Ideas with Film, Video, and Multimedia: A Practical Guide to Information Motion-Media is an insider's perspective on the informational media industry. Award-winning filmmaker S. Martin Shelton presents his astute views on the state of the profession and offers sage, constructive advice for the successful design and production of information motion-media. Forgoing discussions of technology, Shelton instead concentrates on the communication principles that can motivate an audience to achieve a particular goal. His inventive approach coalesces theory of the media with its philosophy, analysis, history, and application, as well as his own informed personal opinions. This valuable guide examines how to effectively encode information in motion-media by using in-depth communication analysis and pertinent filmic design. Organized into five parts that can be used independently or in sequence, the volume frames key topics in the industry that collectively form a cohesive strategy for motion-media design and production. Communicating Ideas with Film, Video, and Multimedia is a "how to do it" book as well as a treatise on "why to do it." Shelton's narrative is complemented by multimedia flowcharts, sample forms, photographs, and a variety of script formats.

Excerpt

I've been active in the information motion-media (kinetic sight-and-sound media) for almost all my adult life, and I love it. I'm truly fortunate to have found my life's calling in a profession that has posed interesting challenges every day. I always learned new things. Met interesting folks. Traveled the world several times over and had a great time doing it. Fortunately, the Hollywood movie bug never bit me. I was always focused on the information motion-media rather than the narrative film, the “movies.” My fiscal rewards were adequate, but the real reward was the love and satisfaction I got from working in this wonderful profession. Perhaps more important my reward was the pride and fulfillment I experienced seeing my shows on the screen. Watching audiences react positively. Garnering praise from clients. And even dealing with my share of “learning experiences.” On the whole, it doesn't get any better than this.

During my long career, I was fortunate to have attended fine schools and to have had demanding teachers, great mentors, exceptional professional associates, empathetic managers, tolerant clients (mostly), an understanding family, and the God-given wherewithal to learn, to work with industry and verve, and to be what I am.

Eventually, time caught me. A few years ago, I retired from active script design, production, and management. On reflection, I'd do it all over again—perhaps a few things differently but essentially all the same. Nowadays, I'm consulting, hosting seminars, and working with the Nevada State Museum building a database of all the historic sites, ghost towns, and mining camps in the state.

Actually, this book on filmic communication has been a workin-progress for some twenty-five-odd years. It's a synthesis of material I've written as formal papers for professional journals, magazine articles, editorials, newsletter columns, jottings, and scribbles on notecards. This book isn't organized like a textbook or a “howto” book. It's a series of essays on motion-media that I've edited and arranged into a coherent pattern in five modules or sections. Each section deals with one major topic. The book can be used as a handy reference for quick perusal to get the kernel of an idea on a particular . . .

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