The Archaeology and Anthropology of Landscape: Shaping Your Landscape

The Archaeology and Anthropology of Landscape: Shaping Your Landscape

The Archaeology and Anthropology of Landscape: Shaping Your Landscape

The Archaeology and Anthropology of Landscape: Shaping Your Landscape

Synopsis

The Archaeology and Anthropology of Landscape contributes to the development of theory in archaeology and anthropology, provides new and varied case studies of landscape and environment from five continents, and raises important policy issues concerning development and the management of heritage.

Excerpt

The third World Archaeological Congress (WAC 3) was held in New Delhi, India, in December 1994. Its academic sessions lasted for five days, some of which were marred by administrative problems within an overly politically fraught atmosphere (and see, e.g., Golson 1995; Hassan 1995; Sawday 1995; Quinn 1999). Happily, the sessions in 'Theme 12: The Frontiers of Landscape Archaeology: time, space and humanity' (originally to be organised by M.K. Dhavalikar, D. Austin, A. Fleming and P.J. Ucko), which form the basis of this book, ran smoothly in the advertised meeting room, and happened more or less on time.

What follow are some of the papers presented in 1994, completely rewritten and updated by their authors for publication as chapters for this book, as well as some specially commissioned new contributions; inevitably-for reasons of space as much as anything else-many of the original 1994 papers have had to be excluded from this volume. Nevertheless, the book maintains much of the original intention of its advertised sub-themes: discussion of new approaches to landscape studies, especially as 'a form of social and environmental enquiry'; landscapes in the context of social power and the exercise of political control; and the management and conservation of landscapes. Above all we have been concerned to keep to the spirit of the 1993 announcement of the WAC 3 landscape theme, which stressed-'possessing your landscape'-that it would also focus on the way in which 'communities understand and express their relationships with their landscapes', and to this end we have included detailed case studies from many different parts of the world.

We thank David Austin, Gabriel Cooney and Andrew Fleming for trying to assist at various times in this whole venture. David Austin was involved first in the UK, then in India and again, subsequently, in the UK. Above all we thank the authors of the following pages for their patience in what has proved to be a very long gestation process.

P.J. Ucko, London

R. Layton, Durham

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