The Southern Cone Model: The Political Economy of Regional Capitalist Development in Latin America

The Southern Cone Model: The Political Economy of Regional Capitalist Development in Latin America

The Southern Cone Model: The Political Economy of Regional Capitalist Development in Latin America

The Southern Cone Model: The Political Economy of Regional Capitalist Development in Latin America

Synopsis

Developing an original blend of perspectives from the fields of international and comparative political economy, this book presents an innovative and in-depth account of the contemporary political economy of the southern cone of Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay. It identifies a new and distinctive model of regional capitalist development emerging in the southern cone and a complex relationship with both the global political economy and the five distinctive national political economies in the region. Ranging across the contours of labour, business, states and regionalist processes, Phillips assesses the significance of the Southern Cone Model for the ways in which we understand contemporary capitalist development at both national and transnational levels.

Excerpt

IPE's pre-occupation with analysing the 'global' is one of the discipline's enduring strengths, but it also a significant weakness. ipe emerged out of an acute need to better understand the dominant patterns of, and systemic influences upon, developments at local, national and regional levels. Its aim in doing so was to overcome some of the short-sighted myopia of national and comparative political economy that refused to acknowledge the growing centrality of the 'global'. in the pursuit of a more suggestive understanding of world political economy, however, ipe has sometimes lost sight of its national and regional roots. the pre-occupation with the 'global' has come to obscure the local, national and regional, and nowhere is this more on display than in the study of regionalism and regionalisation. Scholars have been quick to emphasise the common points of convergence in any number of regional projects, both among participating states and in terms of a dominant global orthodoxy. Few, however, have sought to explain the persistence of national and local variation within and among the states involved. Fewer still have sought to use such an exercise as a vehicle for re-adjusting our theoretical tools for thinking about ipe at the broadest levels.

Nicola Phillips' new book-The Southern Cone Model: the Political Economy of Regional Capitalist Development in Latin America-moves beyond the strictures of IPE's self-inflicted intellectual short-sightedness. in doing so, it advances a truly global vision of political economy. What follows is an account of the political economy of the Southern Cone (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay) that marries the insights of a macro-level analysis with an appreciation of the national and local particularities of the countries involved. Nicola Phillips' work in this regard is both theoretically and empirically novel. Theoretically, Phillips puts forward the case for a political economy that combines the best of both international political economy and its comparative counterpart in a 'controlled eclecticism'. Such an exercise, she argues, overcomes each discipline's preoccupation with global or national particularities as the key determinants of development. Recognising the co-determination of the national and the global, Phillips argues, enables us to move beyond the ridged intellectual parameters of 'path dependency' as the dominant depiction of development, towards a move nuanced understanding of developmental trajectories as 'path conditioned'. Empirically, Phillips' work is rich and rigorous. To support her claim to advance a

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