Scotland and Nationalism: Scottish Society and Politics, 1707 to the Present

Scotland and Nationalism: Scottish Society and Politics, 1707 to the Present

Scotland and Nationalism: Scottish Society and Politics, 1707 to the Present

Scotland and Nationalism: Scottish Society and Politics, 1707 to the Present

Synopsis

First published in 1977, Christopher Harvie's acclaimed study of Scottish culture and politics since the Union of 1707, has been extensively rewritten to bring the story up-to-date and to draw on the remarkable output of Scottish historians and writers in the 1980s.Focusing on poltical nationalism in Scotland, Harvie examines why this nationalism remained apparently in abeyance for two and a half centuries, and why it became so relevant in the second half of the twentieth century.Including a brand new bibliographical index of key personalities and a glossary of nationalist groups, students of Scottish history and of politics will find this a fascinating book.

Excerpt

'We were all assembled to hear Winston make his funeral oration on Roosevelt, but before he started an absurd incident occurred,' Sir Harold Nicolson wrote to his son Nigel in April 1945:

A young man of the name of McIntyre had been elected as Scottish Nationalist for Motherwell. He refused to be introduced by any sponsors, since he does not recognise the Mother of Parliaments and wishes to advertise himself. He advanced to the Bar without sponsors and the Speaker told him that he could not take his oath, as that was contrary to Standing Orders. At which many Members rose offering to sponsor the cub and put an end to the shaming incident, but he refused. He was therefore told to go away and think it over, which he did, shrugging vain shoulders. Next day he thought better of it and accepted sponsors; but even then, as he reached the box, he said, 'I do this under protest', which was not liked at all. He is going to be a sad nuisance and pose as a martyr.

Sir Harold did not approve of Dr Robert McIntyre. Descended from the gentry of Lowland Scotland, his father a former head of the Foreign Office, Nicolson had mirrored the evolution of establishment politics between the wars-from Toryism, through National Labour, to membership of the Labour Party after 1945. Dr McIntyre, a rather dour young medical officer for the county in which the Nicolsons held their title, Stirlingshire, was a son of the manse, pacifist in outlook, who denied that the Mother of Parliaments had any right to order Scotsmen into the

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