Nietzsche and Jung: The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites

Nietzsche and Jung: The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites

Nietzsche and Jung: The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites

Nietzsche and Jung: The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites

Synopsis

Lucy Huskinson reveals the extraordinary connections between the thoughts of Nietzsche & Jung, and in doing so sheds new light on hitherto complex & even ambiguous parts of each man's work.

Excerpt

I have left the writing of this preface to the end, and it has proved very tricky to write, as I have found it surprisingly difficult to detach myself from the content of this work and regard it as a finished product. This book is based on my doctoral thesis, and the greater part of it was written immediately after my doctoral examination. I therefore feel that I have been living and breathing its pages for an exceptionally long time, and with its completion comes the personal acknowledgement that my lively time as a university student is over. This book has found its way through countless revisions, supervisory boards, conference papers and sessions of 'liquid compensation' in the university bar. Indeed, I am not certain at what point I decided to start writing it. Its conception had been developing gradually through the different stages of my studies at the University of Essex. And it is to the people who have contributed most to my learning during this period (both academic and otherwise) that I wish to acknowledge my debt and gratitude.

I came to the University of Essex in October 1995 to read Philosophy. The two highlights of my studies were Freud and Nietzsche. At the time my enthusiasm for Freud was impressive (more so than for Nietzsche, which had been somewhat compromised by the fact that my undergraduate course was restricted to his 'middle period' - to Daybreak, Human, All Too Human and The Gay Science). My studies on Freud led to a master's degree in Psychoanalytic Studies in September 1998. It was here that I first came across Jungian theory. The more I read of Jung, the more I thought back to Nietzsche, and I was surprised that I was quite alone in making the connection. For me, the Jungian Self was clearly a reformulation of the Nietzschean Übermensch. Under the supervision of Roderick Main I wrote my dissertation on their similarities, which I soon discovered were vaster than I had anticipated. I decided then to focus on the role of opposites in their projects, with the greater focus on Jung.

In October 1999 I began my doctoral dissertation, Nietzsche and Jung: The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites, back in the Philosophy Department, under the joint supervision of Simon Critchley and Roderick Main. Near the beginning of my research I became interested in the ambivalent usage of philosophical criticism when applied to Jungian thought - how it can at once elucidate and distort

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