Ambitiosa Mors: Suicide and the Self in Roman Thought and Literature

Ambitiosa Mors: Suicide and the Self in Roman Thought and Literature

Ambitiosa Mors: Suicide and the Self in Roman Thought and Literature

Ambitiosa Mors: Suicide and the Self in Roman Thought and Literature

Synopsis

T.D. Hill traces the cultural logic which dictated the attitude to suicide amongst the Roman nobility. He describes the meaning & significance of often bizarre suicides in the contexts of their time & place, arguing that the significance of the 'noble death' cannot be understood in the context of modern ideas.

Excerpt

Studies in Classics aims to bring high-quality work by emerging scholars to the attention of a wider audience. Emphasizing the study of classical literature and history, these volumes contribute to the theoretical understanding of human culture and society over time. This series will offer an array of approaches to the study of Greek and Latin (including medieval and Neolatin), authors and their reception, canons, transmission of texts, ideas, religion, history of scholarship, narrative, and the nature of evidence.

While the focus is on Mediterranean cultures of the Greco-Roman era, perspectives from other areas, cultural backgrounds, and eras are to be included as important means to the reconstruction of fragmentary evidence and the exploration of models. The series will reflect upon the role classical studies has played in humanistic endeavors from antiquity to the present, and explore select ways in which the discipline can bring both traditional scholarly tools and the experience of modernity to bear on questions and texts of enduring importance.

Dirk Obbink, Oxford University

Andrew Dyck, The University of California, Los Angeles

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