Understanding Sports Coaching: The Social, Cultural and Pedagogical Foundations of Coaching

Understanding Sports Coaching: The Social, Cultural and Pedagogical Foundations of Coaching

Understanding Sports Coaching: The Social, Cultural and Pedagogical Foundations of Coaching

Understanding Sports Coaching: The Social, Cultural and Pedagogical Foundations of Coaching

Synopsis

Sports coaching is as dependent on utilising good teaching and social practices as it is about expertise in sport skills and tactics. Quality sports coaches commonly engage in practices usually associated with teaching such as reflection, feedback and instructional methods. However, many do so implicitly and without fully understanding the complex interplay between coach, player, content and social context. Understanding Sports Coaching provides an innovative introduction to the theory and practice of sports coaching, highlighting the social, cultural and pedagogical concepts underpinning good practice. It also includes practical exercises to highlight issues faced by sports coaches. This book aims to deepen coaches' understanding of the coaching process in order to systematically develop coaching programmes that will get the very best out of athletes. It explores many aspects of coaching practice including: * athlete motivation * viewing the athlete as a learner * instructional methods * coaches' content knowledge * reflection * coaching philosophy and ethics. This is essential reading for students of sports coaching and for professional coaches looking to develop their skills.

Excerpt

It's 11 a.m. on a Saturday morning and the children of Parkway United Under-11 football team are milling around outside the changing rooms eagerly awaiting the start of practice. While the coach, Ian McPherson, makes some last-minute arrangements to the equipment and practice areas, the children are busy keeping themselves occupied. Some of the boys and girls are 'showing off' their latest ball skills, while others tell jokes and discuss what the weekend holds in store for them. Amidst the noise and laughter of young voices, one child stands alone clutching his water bottle and soccer ball with a look of apprehension upon his face. David, whose parents have just moved to the area, is new to the team. This is his second week at practice and he is anxious to make friends and become accepted by the group. Whilst in the process of marking out one of the practice grids, Ian looks up and notices how David seems to be ignored by the other children but decides to take no action on this occasion.

With the practice areas neatly marked out, Ian signals the start of the training session with a short blast on his whistle. the children run over to Ian, as they like him and enjoy their coaching sessions with him - well most of them anyway. Ian begins the session with a warm-up game of soccer tag, which has proven to be popular with the children. the game involves one boy and one girl attempting to tag the other children by kicking the ball against them. Ian chooses Rachel and David to be the kickers. On a signal from Ian, the rest of the team move around the practice area and attempt to avoid the balls which are being kicked at them. After a minute or two, it becomes apparent that David lacks the physical skills to hit the other children. Indeed, many of the children begin to mock him while Rachel complains that it's not fair having to partner David, as 'he's rubbish'. Ian lets the game go on for a minute or two longer before replacing David as one of the kickers. the new kicker, Austin, is one of the more highly skilled players on the team. the change of partner seems to reinvigorate Rachel's enthusiasm for the game and she announces to the rest of the team that the kickers 'will now show everyone how to play this game properly'.

The athletes

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.