Money / Space: Geographies of Monetary Transformation

Money / Space: Geographies of Monetary Transformation

Money / Space: Geographies of Monetary Transformation

Money / Space: Geographies of Monetary Transformation

Synopsis

Bringing together in one volume the most important writings of Andrew Leyshon and Nigel Thrift on money and finance, including the unpublished classic "Sexy-Greedy" this collection examines the economic, social and cultural manifestations that go to make up the multiple vision of money. Money, it seems is the great God of our age. It is also an economy, a sociology, an anthropolgy and a geography. Linking money with the emergent patterns of global spatial order. Money/Space analyses the restructuring of financial markets in a range of spatial scales; global, national and local.

Excerpt

Towards the end of Loyalties, one of Raymond Williams's last novels, a besieged South Wales mining community awaits its nemesis in the miners' strike of 1984. One of the miners, Dic, with his blood up, shouts defiance, 'let the buggers come, we'll see in the end of it'. But Gwyn, a more cosmopolitan character, offers a warning in response: 'they don't have to come, Dic. They can do it from where they are. This is a world of paper and money. It's taken priority over coal, people, anything else that's real and alive' (Williams 1985:341).

This is a book about this world of paper and money. Williams was surely right to stress the importance of this world, and its ubiquity. But he was wrong to characterise it as an impersonal force. If there is one message that we want to impart more than any other in this book, it is that money is a social process.

In exploring the conundrum of money, this book's chief aims are therefore fourfold. The first aim is simply to describe the economy of international money. In carrying out this aim, we intend to make a contribution to a number of literatures but most especially the literature on the new international political economy with its emphasis on the interconnectedness of international economics, international politics, national economics and national politics. A second aim is to link the economy of international money with the distribution of social power. Here we see our chief contribution being to the burgeoning area of economic sociology and most especially to the work on the social and cultural embeddedness of finance capital and financial markets. Our third aim is to show some of the ways in which this world of money is discursively constituted through particular social-cultural practices. Here we conceive of money as information circulating in specific, separate but overlapping actor-networks, made up of actors, texts and machines, which think and practise money in separate but overlapping ways. Then, finally, our fourth aim is to show how the world of money is constructed out of and through geography, and at a number of different spatial frames. In particular, this book operates within four such frames: the global monetary economy, the national space of Britain, the regional space of the south of England, and the concentrated urban space of the City of London. Our intention here is to contribute, in particular, to the debates on the global and the local.

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