Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity

Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity

Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity

Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity

Synopsis

Asian American Youth covers topics such as Asian immigration, acculturation, assimilation, intermarriage, socialization, sexuality, and ethnic identification. The distinguished contributors show how Asian American youth have created an identity and space for themselves historically and in contemporary multicultural America.

Excerpt

This volume centers on Asian American youth, focusing specifically on the way in which they create and practice a culture that is distinctively their own. In turn, this distinctive Asian American youth culture has powerfully shaped Asian American youth's daily lives and ethnic identities. Until recently, social science research rarely treated Asian American youth as a distinct analytical category. In fact, when we discuss Asian American youth culture with academic and lay people, we are often met with puzzled looks, followed by questions such as: "Is there such a thing as Asian American youth culture?" "Do Asian American youth have a culture of their own?" "If so, what is it like?"

To many Americans, Asian American youth do not fit into any of the popular images typically associated with youth culture or subcultures, such as hip-hop artists and rappers, hippies, skinheads, punks, graffiti writers, low riders, ravers, or suburban "mall rats," with the exception, perhaps, of gang members. For a long time, Asian American youth have been neglected or at best homogenized into a social group widely celebrated as the "model minority" while derogatively stereotyped as "nerds" or "geeks." As such, they are considered a uniform group and deviant from "normal" teenage Americans.

Through the chapters in this volume, we counteract this one-dimensional portrait, showing the diversity among Asian American youth and illustrating how they have created a culture of their own through "grassroots cultural production" (Bielby, 2004). Moreover, in the process of creating a distinct culture, they have also redefined the Asian American . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.