Europeanisation, National Identities, and Migration: Changes in Boundary Constructions between Western and Eastern Europe

Europeanisation, National Identities, and Migration: Changes in Boundary Constructions between Western and Eastern Europe

Europeanisation, National Identities, and Migration: Changes in Boundary Constructions between Western and Eastern Europe

Europeanisation, National Identities, and Migration: Changes in Boundary Constructions between Western and Eastern Europe

Synopsis

This book provides theoretical and empirical discussion of migration, identity and Europeanisation. With contributions from leading international scholars, it provides both an overview of theoretical perspectives and a comprehensive set of case studies, covering both Eastern and Western Europe. Contributors draw from disciplines such as historical sociology, discourse analysis, social psychology and migration studies, while the editors bring these subjects into a coherent theoretical and historical framework, to discuss the emergence of new collective identities and new borders in Europe today.

Excerpt

Anna Triandafyllidou and Willfried Spohn

The decade following the European revolution of 1989-91 has witnessed a progressive, although in many ways difficult, reconnection of the divided Europe. With this development, the basic structural and cultural pluralism of a common 'European civilisation' (Eisenstadt 1987) - damaged by the Second World War and torn apart by the Cold War system - is in the process of restoration. This overall process includes particularly the restoration and re-organisation of the European system of nation-states and with them the redefinition and often intensification of national identities and reciprocal boundary constructions. the contemporary reconstruction and restructuration of nation-states in Europe, however, does not simply continue the thread of the pre-Second World War and pre-Cold War era of the modern nation-state. Rather, two major social forces are at work in contemporary Europe: the dynamics of European integration and the growing consequences of international migration and with them the transformation of national identities.

The European integration process, on the one hand, has developed in deepening and widening movements in Western Europe since 1945, pooling and mediating the sovereignty of the participating member states. the imminent Eastern enlargement of the European Union will have similar impacts on the postcommunist nation-states of Central and Eastern Europe. As a consequence, the classical model of the nation-state as a sovereign entity of political-territorial centre-formation is to an increasing degree in the process of modification. International migration, on the other hand, has for several decades had an impact on the most developed nation-states in Western Europe, yet in the last decade it has not only been intensifying, but its impact has also been increasingly felt in Southern and Central Eastern Europe (see the chapters by Romaniszyn and Morawska in this volume). With it, the notion of cultural homogeneity as the basis of the politically-centralised nation-state is to a growing measure modified by ethnic minorities and immigrant communities. Both of these processes of transnational modification of states and nations in Europe also manifest themselves - at least as a tendency - in a stronger weight of European and multicultural elements in collective identities.

The contributions assembled in this volume address these two major social forces of transnational modifications of nation-states and collective identities in contemporary Europe in a Western and Eastern comparative perspective. Most

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