The Translation Studies Reader

The Translation Studies Reader

The Translation Studies Reader

The Translation Studies Reader

Synopsis

The Translation Studies Reader is the definitive reader for the study of this dynamic interdisciplinary field. Providing an introduction to translation studies, this book places a wide range of readings within their social, thematic, and historical contexts. The selections included are from the twentieth century, with a particular focus on the last thirty years of the century. Features include:*Organization into five chronological sections, divided by decade*An introductory essay prefacing each section*A detailed bibliography and suggestions for further reading. Readings: Kwame Anthony Appiah, Walter Benjamin, Antoine Berman, Shoshana Blum-Kulka, Jorge Luis Borges, Annie Brisset, J.C. Catford, Lori Chamberlain, Jean Darbelnet and Jean-Paul Vinay, Itamar Even-Zohar, William Frawley, Ernst-August Gutt, Keith Harvey, Basil Hatim and Ian Mason, James S. Holmes, Roman Jakobson, Andre Lefevere, Jiri Levy, Philip E. Lewis, Vladimir Nabakov, Eugen Nida, Jose Ortega y Gasset, Ezra Pound, Willard V.O. Quine, Katharina Reiss, Gayatri Spivak, George Steiner, Gideon Toury, Hans J. Vermeer A new piece by Lawrence Venuti suggests the future of translation studies.

Excerpt

This reader gathers essays, articles, and book chapters that represent many of the main approaches to the study of translation developed during the twentieth century, focusing particularly on the past thirty years. It was during this period that translation studies emerged as a new academic field, at once international and interdisciplinary. The need for a reader is thus partly institutional, created by the rapid growth of the discipline, especially as evidenced by the proliferation of translator training programs worldwide. Recent surveys indicate more than 250, offering a variety of certificates and degrees, undergraduate and graduate, training not only professional translators, but also scholar-teachers of translation and of foreign languages and literatures (Caminade and Pym 1995; Harris 1997).

This growth has been accompanied by diverse forms of translation research and commentary, some oriented toward pedagogy, yet most falling within-or crossing-traditional academic disciplines, such as linguistics, literary criticism, philosophy, and anthropology. The aim of the reader is to bring together a substantial selection from this varied mass of writing, but in the form of a historical survey that invites sustained examination of key theoretical developments.

Of course, edited volumes always work to define a field, a body of knowledge, a textbook market, and so they create as much as satisfy institutional needs, especially in the case of emergent disciplines. In translation studies, the broad spectrum of theories and research methodologies may doom any assessment of its “current state” to partial representation, superficial synthesis, optimistic canonization. This Reader is intended to be an introduction to the field recognizable to the scholars who work within it. But the intention is also to challenge any

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