Contemplating Suicide: The Language and Ethics of Self-Harm

Contemplating Suicide: The Language and Ethics of Self-Harm

Contemplating Suicide: The Language and Ethics of Self-Harm

Contemplating Suicide: The Language and Ethics of Self-Harm

Synopsis

Fairbairn takes a fresh look at suicidal self-harm and reaches many novel conclusions about the current language and ethics of suicide and contributing greatly to the development of understanding in this sensitive area.

Excerpt

At times I have written in a personal way, owning experiences as having happened to me and bringing them to bear upon the subject matter with which I am dealing. Other parts of my personal experience, for reasons of confidentiality, I have written about in a more impersonal style, attributing them to imaginary characters. Referring to first hand experiences, whether of myself or others, is perhaps unusual in a philosophical book. However, I hope that doing so has helped me to guard against the possibility of falling into the trap of writing philosophically in a way that fails really to connect with what matters to those whose lives and work bring them into contact with the human phenomena and dilemmas with which I am concerned. I have, however, tried to avoid simply gossiping about personal experience; when real cases are referred to they are used in making points with more general application.

At other times I use the device, beloved of the majority of moral philosophers who deal in similar areas, of invoking hypothetical, sometimes rather far fetched, examples; I hope it is obvious from the context when I am doing this rather than using real case studies. the use of stories which are successively modified in order to make points is arguably the principal tool of the applied moral philosopher. It is interesting to note its relationship to other disciplines including psychodrama, where it relates closely to the use of techniques such as role play (Moreno, 1948), and theology, where it relates to the spiritual exercises devised by St Ignatius (Fleming, 1980) and also to more recent work about ways of developing understanding of Biblical events (Galloway, 1988).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.