Science and Technical Writing: A Manual of Style

Science and Technical Writing: A Manual of Style

Science and Technical Writing: A Manual of Style

Science and Technical Writing: A Manual of Style

Synopsis

With this new edition, Science and Technical Writing confirms its position as the definitive style resource for thousands of established and aspiring technical writers. Editor Philip Rubens has fully revised and updated his popular 1992 edition, with full, authoritative coverage of the techniques and technologies that have revolutionized electronic communications over the past eight years.

Excerpt

It is certainly a pleasure to be offering a second edition of this text after nearly a decade of helping writers and editors prepare useful documents. During that time, many aspects of communication have changed, many have remained the same. It is difficult to imagine that attention to grammar and presentation has gone out of style. But the advent of accessible electronic information has influenced this edition, as it should. Moreover, we have taken this opportunity to incorporate and emphasize aspects of communication that seem more germane to contemporary interests. Thus, for example, guidance with creating texts for non-native audiences appears earlier in this text-chapter 2: “Writing for Non-native Audiences.” Similarly, we have incorporated text where it seemed to make sense: chapter 6: “Incorporating Specialized Terminology” includes abbreviations, chapter 8: “Using Quotations, Citations, and References” combines the techniques for citing any information source.

At the same time, we have recognized the importance of new techniques and technologies. Thus, chapter 10: “Creating Nontextual Information” offers an extended discussion of using computers to create texts and supporting visuals for both print and online display. That discussion is further supported by discussions of computerized aids in virtually every chapter. Chapter 9: “Creating Indexes, ” for example, offers guidance on selecting electronic indexing systems; even chapter 5: “Using Acceptable Spelling” discusses the use of electronic dictionaries and other spelling aids.

Most chapters have added significant new material. Chapter 1: “Audience Analysis and Document Planning, ” for instance, includes a new discussion of information types and their relationship to appropriate presentation media. Some parts of the text have undergone significant revision. Chapter 2: “Writing for Non-native Audiences” departs significantly from the previous edition by adding guidance on Controlled and Global English. Chapter 3: “Grammar, Usage, and Revising for Publication” offers slightly less guidance in favor of the discussion provided in chapter 2. The rationale in this instance is that good writing practices that make texts easier

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