Dying Right: The Death with Dignity Movement

Dying Right: The Death with Dignity Movement

Dying Right: The Death with Dignity Movement

Dying Right: The Death with Dignity Movement

Synopsis

Dying Right is the first work to provide a comprehensive and first-hand account of the Death with Dignity movement in the USA and around the world. The book also provides an in-depth look at Oregon, the first place to legalize physician-assisted suicide. Engaging the question of how to balance a patient's sense about the right way to die, a physician's role as a healer, and the state's interest in preventing killing, Dying Right captures the ethical, legal, moral and medical complexities involved in this ongoing debate.

Excerpt

Our analysis looks at how legal reformers have succeeded in raising the issue of the legalization of physician-assisted suicide and in passing the world's first law permitting the practice, advanced by public support for compassion and autonomy in an era of medicalized dying.

Dying Right examines how social reformers were successful in convincing a majority of voters in one American state (Oregon) to provide a safe harbor provision in the state's law prohibiting assisted suicide in cases of competent, terminally ill Oregon adults who repeatedly request physicians to prescribe a lethal dose of medication. This book describes the political conduciveness of the Oregon electorate to assisted suicide reform, the mobilization of proponent and opponent campaigns, the framing of issues within the opposing campaigns, and the planning and execution of strategies and counterstrategies. The roles of public opinion, organized medicine, organized religion, and key activists and their organizational bases are described in great detail. Our analysis of the motives, intentions, deliberations, and choices of organizational and citizen activists contributes to the sociolegal literature on the role of social agency in law, morality, and social change.

During the seven years of this study, it has been our good fortune to meet scholars from around the world with similar research interests. John Griffiths-a Dutch legal scholar whose book on euthanasia in the Netherlands is a sociolegal tour de force-once reminded us that regional controversies such as the one in Oregon are but local manifestations of a wider sea change taking place in the relationships between patients and physicians in industrialized countries around the world. To this end, this book depicts the nation's first state law to openly permit physician-assisted suicide, in the broader context of the social history of medical thinking and medical practice. We also connect the analysis to the rights consciousness of Americans that has been so

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.