War and the State in Early Modern Europe: Spain, the Dutch Republic, and Sweden as Fiscal-Military States, 1500-1660

War and the State in Early Modern Europe: Spain, the Dutch Republic, and Sweden as Fiscal-Military States, 1500-1660

War and the State in Early Modern Europe: Spain, the Dutch Republic, and Sweden as Fiscal-Military States, 1500-1660

War and the State in Early Modern Europe: Spain, the Dutch Republic, and Sweden as Fiscal-Military States, 1500-1660

Synopsis

The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries saw many ambitious European rulers develop permanent armies and navies. War and the State in Early Modern Europe examines this military change as a central part of the political, social and economic transformation of early modern Europe.This important study exposes the economic structures necessary for supporting permanent military organisations across Europe. Large armed forces could not develop successfully without various interest groups who needed protection and were willing to pay for it. Arguing that early fiscal-military states were in fact protection-selling enterprises, the author focuses on:* Spain, the Dutch Republic and Sweden* the role of local elites* the political and organisational aspects of this new military development

Excerpt

This book has been written with a grant from the Faculty of Humanities, Stockholm University, for studies in early modern state formation and military development. There are many who have been helpful in various ways, and only a few can be mentioned here.

Originally, the study was part of a research project that Harald Gustafsson, now Professor of History at Lund University, initiated in 1992. Another part of my research in that project was published by Routledge in 2000 as Warfare at Sea, 1500-1650: Maritime Conflicts and the Transformation of Europe. Harald Gustafsson's interest in placing early modern Nordic state formation in a theoretical and international perspective was easy to combine with my own interest of finding some kind of pattern in the development of European fiscal-military states. Without his enthusiasm for starting our project it is doubtful if this book would have been written.

Professor Jeremy Black invited me to write the study as a part of the Warfare and History series. Professor Black has also patiently read the drafts of the manuscript and tried to improve it in style and content. I am very thankful for both his help and the many stimulating ideas about military and political transformation that he has developed over more than a decade.

For many years I have discussed early modern Swedish military and naval history with several Swedish and Finnish historians. I especially wish to thank Professor Gunnar Artéus of the Swedish Defence College, Stockholm, Professor Jan Lindegren of Uppsala University and Professor Nils-Erik Villstrand of Åbo Academy, Finland, not only for stimulating discussions but also for much seminal research, which has markedly improved our understanding of the Swedish fiscal-military state. I have also been very fortunate to become acquainted with Dr Gunner Lind of Copenhagen University and Niels M. Probst, whose studies of Danish-Norwegian military and naval history have been very valuable for me. In the Netherlands, Professor J.R. Bruijn of Leiden University has for many years been a very helpful guide to modern research about the Dutch navy. I also wish to thank Professor Magnus Mörner, Professor Enrique Martínez Ruiz and Dr Magdalena de

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