Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching

Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching

Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching

Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching

Synopsis

Making Sense of Education provides a contemporary introduction to the key issues in educational philosophy and theory. Exploring major past and present conceptions of education, teaching and learning, this book aims to make philosophy of education relevant to the professional practice of teachers and student teachers, as well of interest to those studying education as an academic subject. The book is divided into three parts: * Education, teaching and professional practice : issues concerning education, the role of the teacher, the relationship of educational theory to practice and the wider moral dimensions of pedagogy. * Learning, knowledge and curriculum : issues concerning behaviourist and cognitive theories of learning, knowledge and meaning, curriculum aims and content, and evaluation and assessment. * Schooling, society and culture : issues of the wider social and political context of education concerning liberalism and communitarianism, justice and equality, differentiation, authority and discipline. This timely and up-to-date introduction should assist all those studying and/or working in education to appreciate the main philosophical sources of and influences on present day thinking about education, teaching and learning

Excerpt

Some years ago, it occurred to me that the days of fairly frequent introductions to philosophy of education seemed to have gone, and that there seemed to be something of a need in the contemporary literature for an updated work of this kind, still in the broad analytical tradition of previous introductory works, which might nevertheless attempt to take account of recent developments in the field for the possible benefit of a professional or wider readership. The present work is an attempt, following a struggle of some three years with what proved to be a rather harder task than I originally anticipated, to provide just such an introduction.

In prospect of this goal, at all events, the work has three broad aims. First, it sets out to provide the reader with some understanding of the crucial relevance of such past great philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Mill, Frege and Wittgenstein to contemporary philosophy of education. Secondly, it attempts to deal with some of the more recent developments in educational philosophy under the influence of what are sometimes (perhaps misleadingly) called 'non-analytical' or 'post-analytical' philosophical traditions. In this respect, there is appreciable critical engagement in this work with neo-idealist and communitarian perspectives on moral and social theory, pragmatist conceptions of epistemology, structuralist approaches to learning and understanding, neo-Marxist and post-structural (and hence, at least by implication, postmodern) hegemonic analyses of society and education - though I have also chosen to focus here only on what seem to me to be the most educationally significant of such developments. Thirdly, however, I have considered it important at all stages and in all parts of this work to maintain close contact with those key issues and problems of professional policy and practice that are to a great extent the raison d'être of educational philosophy. From this viewpoint, not only is the author of the present work an academically trained philosopher who has over the years published in many leading mainsteam philosophical as well as educational journals, but he is also a former primary and secondary school teacher who has been professionally involved with the preparation and supervision of classroom teachers for over a quarter-century. Indeed, a good deal of my previously published work on teaching and learning has been a direct result of first-hand experience and observation of on-site professional practice.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.