Continuing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Teachers and Schools

Continuing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Teachers and Schools

Continuing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Teachers and Schools

Continuing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Teachers and Schools

Synopsis

The second edition of this popular text enables teachers to analyse their own experience of in-service work and offers tools for evaluating a focused aspect of work. It helps teachers to: *explore models of in-service provision *develop understandings of professional and institutional development *review and describe their own in-service work *develop and apply criteria for evaluating the quality and value of in-service work *identify appropriate areas for future in-service work The second edition of this book has been updated in the light of developments that have taken place over the last few years including new policies from the DfEE and directives from the TTA.

Excerpt

In this chapter, we consider the process of appraisal (or staff development and review, as it is sometimes known in Scotland). We take the stance that it offers, potentially, both a way of identifying professional development needs and also of reconciling tensions between individual and school priorities. The process of appraisal provides a way of moving from identifying needs to setting up a series of actions which aim to do something about fulfilling them.

THE NATURE OF APPRAISAL

The introduction of teacher and head teacher appraisal in England and Wales has been a long and tortuous process. The 1980s witnessed a steady growth of school-based appraisal schemes and increasing interest in moving towards a national framework. The national School Teacher Appraisal Pilot Study of 1987-89 was set up following lengthy consultation between government and teacher unions from 1982-86. The pilot study was designed to inform the design of national appraisal guidelines and played a major role in developing the model that was eventually introduced by the government in the 1991 appraisal regulations and circular (Secretary of State for Education and Science, 1991a and b). It remains a contentious and debated area, since the publication of the Green Paper in 1998 (DfEE, 1998).

The path has been similar in Scotland. In 1984, the National Committee for the In-service Training of Teachers (NCITT) published a report entitled 'Arrangements for the Staff Development of Teachers'. As part of its concern for the quality of pupils' education this report made two important statements. It defined staff development as the full range of planned activities and experiences which contribute to maintaining and developing professional expertise. The report also stated that there was a need to establish better management arrangements for planning and co-ordinating the wide range of training and development activities.

In the period following publication, there was a growing awareness of the implications of the new, wider definition. There was also an increased

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