American Anthropology, 1921-1945: Papers from the American Anthropologist

American Anthropology, 1921-1945: Papers from the American Anthropologist

American Anthropology, 1921-1945: Papers from the American Anthropologist

American Anthropology, 1921-1945: Papers from the American Anthropologist

Synopsis

The 39 selections in this volume represent the interests & accomplishments of American anthropology from the 1920s through to the end of World War II. The papers include seminal contributions by leading anthropologists.

Excerpt

When I began active work on this anthology I did not plan such an extensive introductory essay. I had not done systematic work on much of the interwar period, and I felt that all I could attempt in the time available would be a briefer overview based on existing sources. Although still based on such sources, and on my own previous work in other contexts, the present essay ended up rather more ambitious than originally intended. Even so, it is still frankly an overview, and subject to all the defects of that form. There are surely topics and people barely mentioned or totally omitted that might be better treated in a different or larger framework. To those disturbed by such neglect I apologize, appealing to the tentativeness of my title. I would like to feel that the essay will be of some moderately enduring value, but I am sure that more detailed research would force modifications in the argument—the more so since the pressure of time did not allow me to take full advantage of collegial criticism. Even so, I have accumulated many debts. in addition to the people mentioned below in the two notes on sources and selection who generously offered me advice or provided me with materials— several of whom did in fact comment on the completed manuscript—I would like to thank a number of others unmentioned elsewhere. Barry Karl was very helpful in orienting me bibliographically. Harry Basehart, Bill Fenton, Al Lesser and Leonard Outhwaite provided information on specific points. in a more general way, I have profited greatly from the memories of Fred Eggan and Sol Tax. Robert Murphy, the editor of the subsequent volume in this set, was very cooperative—consulting where necessary, but generally sharing my laissez-faire attitude toward our parallel, but distinct, enterprises. Edward Lehman was helpful on the technical aspects of compiling the anthology, and even more so by recognizing the importance of purely scholarly criteria in a period when they . . .

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