Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Schizophrenia

Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Schizophrenia

Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Schizophrenia

Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Schizophrenia

Synopsis

Models of Madness shows that hallucinations and delusions are understandable reactions to life events and circumstances rather than symptoms of a supposed genetic predisposition or biological disturbance. International contributors:* critique the 'medical model' of madness* examine the dominance of the 'illness' approach to understanding madness from historical and economic perspectives* document the role of drug companies* outline the alternative to drug based solutions* identify the urgency and possibility of prevention of madness.Models of Madnesspromotes a more humane and effective response to treating severely distressed people that will prove essential reading for psychiatrists and clinical psychologists and of great interest to all those who work in the mental health service. This book forms part of the International Society for the Psychological Treatment of Psychosesseries edited by Brian Martindale.

Excerpt

In June 2000 I was sitting outside my hotel in Stavanger, Norway, preparing the seminar about child abuse and schizophrenia that I was to give later in the day, to the 800 or so people who had come to the 13th International Symposium for the Psychological Treatments of Schizophrenia and other psychoses. I will be forever grateful to Jan Olav Johannessen (the ISPS President) for inviting me to Norway, not least because of what happened next. At a nearby table three people were talking about how hard it is to get psychiatrists to realize the obvious fact that people are driven crazy by bad things happening to them. I overcame my usual shyness to introduce myself with some comment about 'Now I won't need to give my seminar-I'll be preaching to the converted' or some such nonsense. The three were to become good friends of mine before the conference was over. One was Volkmar Aderhold, a German psychiatrist with whom, a year later, I would be exchanging Dad stories in his Hamburg apartment (his was in the weapons branch of the S.S., mine was a British fighter pilot-so we both understand the inter generational effects of bad things happening). The second was Petra Hohn, who gave a remarkable talk the next day-full of warmth, humanity and common sense-about her work in Sweden with people diagnosed 'schizophrenic'. The third, by far the shortest despite his hat, was Loren Mosher. When he said his name I had to stifle one of those awful 'not the Loren Mosher?' comments (although Loren would have loved it!). For twenty years I had been citing his work to any poor sod who would listen, as evidence that people who go crazy need other people more than they need medical-sounding labels and tranquillizing drugs.

The point of this story is that after four days in Stavanger I plummeted from an enormous high (partly jet-lag, partly short Norwegian nights, but mostly the excitement of finding so many kindred spirits in such a short time) to an exhausted low in my one night Oslo hotel, missing my new friends already. (I was too old to get bi-polar disorder I remember thinking.) Anyway, the next morning I found the solution to my 'low affect'. I decided to try to capture the spirit of Stavanger in a book and laid out, over breakfast, the first of many subsequent outlines and possible authors. . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.