On the Theory and Therapy of Mental Disorders: An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis

On the Theory and Therapy of Mental Disorders: An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis

On the Theory and Therapy of Mental Disorders: An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis

On the Theory and Therapy of Mental Disorders: An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis

Synopsis

Logotherapy and Existential Analysis has been internationally recognized for decades as an empirically supported humanistic school of psychotherapy. Evidence for the growing significance of logotherapy includes institutes, societies and professorships in many countries of the world, as well as conferences and publications. On the Theory and Therapy of Neuroses: An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis, the translation of Viktor Frankl's Theorie und Therapie der Neurosen by James M. DuBois, will allow for the first time English-only readers to experience this essential text on logotherapy.

Excerpt

James M. DuBois

This book provides a much-needed corrective to the way that Viktor Frankl is often understood. He is frequently viewed as a popular writer. This is not without good reason. His book Man's Search for Meaning (Frankl, 1962), sold over 9 million copies worldwide and he is cited in many popular books like The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (Covey, 1989). Frankl is also frequently viewed as an existentialist or humanistic psychologist. This too is not without good reason. Gordon Allport introduced his writings to the United States and much like Allport, Maslow, Fromm, and Rogers, Frankl addressed the existential themes of human freedom, responsibility, values, spirituality, and death. Yet to view Frankl simply as a popular, humanistic psychologist is to fundamentally misunderstand who he was as a person and what he represented.

Frankl was a physician and a professor of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Vienna. His view of psychiatric treatment went beyond existential counseling and included the medical tools of his day: hypnosis, electroconvulsive therapy, psychopharmaceuticals, and relaxation exercises. While the humanistic approach to psychotherapy is sometimes viewed as fundamentally opposed to standard psychiatric approaches, Viktor Frankl's theory of mental disorders allowed him to reconcile these two worlds-the worlds of lived experience and of medical science and practice.

1 Gordon Allport wrote the preface to Man's Search for Meaning (Frankl, 1962). In his last line he calls logotherapy “the most significant psychological movement of our day.”

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