The Anatomy of Bereavement: A Handbook for the Caring Professions

The Anatomy of Bereavement: A Handbook for the Caring Professions

The Anatomy of Bereavement: A Handbook for the Caring Professions

The Anatomy of Bereavement: A Handbook for the Caring Professions

Synopsis

Bereavement is a painful and inevitable experience. This book shares the experience of many bereavements, how they are dealt with, understood, and eventually adapted to in the ongoing framework of human life.

Excerpt

This book has grown out of my work and research with bereaved people over many years. The form and content have developed from my reading and understanding of the work of many of the innovative and valuable contributors to this field. Bereavement is an ubiquitous human experience-painful and inevitable. In this book I try to share the experience of many different bereavements, how they are dealt with, understood, and eventually adapted to in the ongoing framework of human life. The work has derived from the workers who have written in this field, but especially from the people who have experienced and shared their losses and their deaths.

There are many people who have helped me in many ways with the writing of this book. It gives me great pleasure to be able to thank them for their support and assistance over many years.

Firstly, I would like to thank all those bereaved people who have shared their feelings and thoughts and experiences with me over the years. They have greatly influenced my understanding of grief and its processes. They will not recognize themselves directly in the histories in this book for these are a complex amalgam of many, many different losses. But I do hope they will feel represented by what I have written. I especially wish them to know of my warm gratitude.

I would like to thank my professional colleagues who have shared their experience and understanding of bereavement and who have offered constructive criticisms, thoughts, and questions that have all helped shape what appears here. In particular, I am deeply indebted to Dr. John Bowlby who has offered me great support and encouragement of my work, a support offered from outside my own country, which has meant a great deal to me. I am also indebted to the late Professor David Maddison who first persuaded me to become interested in the field of bereavement, whose studies were the beginnings from which my own work grew, and who was a generous mentor and friend until the time of his death.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.