Faith, Politics, and Nazism: Selected Essays

Faith, Politics, and Nazism: Selected Essays

Faith, Politics, and Nazism: Selected Essays

Faith, Politics, and Nazism: Selected Essays

Synopsis

This volume comprises a representative selection of essays of the late Uriel Tal. The cultural depth, clarity of exposition and scholarly richness of Tal's essays will establish formidable standards for the future volumes in this series.

Excerpt

Like the new journal TMPR, the Cass book series Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions aims to bring to the notice of an English readership not only earlier work of enduring, or classic, significance, such as this important inaugural collection of essays and public lectures by the distinguished Israeli historian Uriel Tal, but also the writings of major contemporary scholars and younger authors whose approaches reflect the core intellectual concerns of the journal and series shared title. Hence the series reflects a dynamic tradition, represented by such scholars as James Billington, Philippe Burrin, Emilio Gentile, Arthur Klinghoffer, Hans Maier, Arthur Mendel and Saul Friedländer, and one which we hope to perpetuate by enabling younger scholars to publish their first work in our series. Neither of the terms used in our title is uncontroversial, as anyone familiar with the controversies surrounding the recent work of, for example François Furet, Stephane Courtois, or indeed Arno Meyer, will appreciate. Hopefully, future books in the series will make some of the ensuing international debates, for example on Courtois's Black Book of Communism accessible to an Anglophone audience.

Contrary to the misleading view propagated in some historiographical manuals on Nazi Germany or the former Soviet Union, work which uses the paradigm of totalitarianism to convey these regimes' distinctive, but similarly, beastly aspirations and policies is not an intellectual relic of the Cold War, but very much alive and well in several European countries, including France, Italy and Germany, if not Great Britain, although even there, things may be changing.

The Italian nationalist Giuseppe Garibaldi was responsible for a fighting version of the Lord's Prayer which included the immortal line: 'Give us today our daily cartridges'. The journal and series will consistently include work which uses such terms as civil, secular and political religion as a way of explaining a variety of regimes and polities in the past and present. Again, the main emphasis will be upon how and why what amounted to secularised redemptive heresies re-emerged in a modern ideological guise, although the series will also deal with the liturgical,

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.