The Secret War against Sweden: US and British Submarine Deception and Political Control in the 1980s

The Secret War against Sweden: US and British Submarine Deception and Political Control in the 1980s

The Secret War against Sweden: US and British Submarine Deception and Political Control in the 1980s

The Secret War against Sweden: US and British Submarine Deception and Political Control in the 1980s

Synopsis

From 1981 onwards the Swedes found themselves in a war of deception that involved US and British submarines opposing supposed Soviet enemy submarines. Today all evidence for Soviet intrusions into Swedish national waters appears to have been manipulated, or simply invented.

Excerpt

Just as the Cold War between the United States and NATO and the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies was beginning to wind down, a bizarre series of events took place in the Baltic. First, an old Whiskey submarine of the Soviet Union's Baltic fleet, allegedly carrying nuclear-tipped torpedoes, ran aground on some rocks that were well inside Sweden's territorial waters. Shortly afterwards, there occurred a series of strange events in which a number of Swedish citizens, and some military personnel too, began to report seeing signs of mysterious submarines nosing about in Sweden's inland waters. This sparked off a long 'submarine summer' of alarms and concerns.

Around the world, commentators took up their pens to speculate about what it could all mean. First, there was a debate about whether there really were submarines about, or whether it was all the product of fevered imagination and media hype. At some stages, the Swedish submarine issue threatened almost to become another version of Scotland's preoccupation with the Loch Ness monster. Second, there were those who assumed that if there were indeed submarines in Sweden's waters, then they must be Soviet ones. This in turn led to much debate about what the Soviets meant by this. Was it perhaps a coded warning to Sweden not to become too friendly to NATO in the new strategic environment that was rapidly unfolding? Was it freelance political activity by some of the murkier elements of the Soviet system over whom Mr Gorbachev had less than perfect control? Was it, alternatively, elements in the Baltic fleet who wanted their sub-mariners to get in some realistic practice?

There was even the quite serious suggestion that this was preparation for a Spetsnaz campaign to get people ashore to decapitate the Swedish government and air force in the event of an East-West crisis, in which Sweden seemed likely to be moving away from its position of neutrality and getting too friendly with the West. Evidence for this kind of interpretation was, of course, bolstered by the original 'Whiskey-on-the-rocks' affair and by the certain fact that similar

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