New Borders for a Changing Europe: Cross-Border Cooperation and Governance

New Borders for a Changing Europe: Cross-Border Cooperation and Governance

New Borders for a Changing Europe: Cross-Border Cooperation and Governance

New Borders for a Changing Europe: Cross-Border Cooperation and Governance

Synopsis

As Europe's internal and external borders change, states become defensive. This is a study of identity economic integration, governance and communication between states.

Excerpt

State borders, long considered peripheral in every sense, have now become a major concern due to globalization and the ongoing construction of the European Union. Cross-border cooperation and governance are central to its continuing integration and enlargement. There is increasing awareness that we have to understand the nature of borders and how they are changing in order to appreciate the need and the opportunities for cooperation across them. Borders are inherently ambiguous, paradoxical and contradictory in nature, and now they are also becoming increasingly differentiated from each other and in terms of their filtering effects on different social processes. We need to analyse how they function to understand the obstacles to cross-border cooperation, how networks of trust can be established, and how the democratic governance of cooperation might be achieved. Conversely, the growing centrality of cross-border processes and communities is indicative of changing state and inter-state relations and the emerging European and world order.

This volume discusses the reasons for the upsurge of interest in borders and cross-border cooperation, their changing historical significance in Europe, their economic basis, and how they could be regulated cooperatively and democratically. the collection covers legal and security aspects of cross-border governance: it analyses cross-border participatory rights under European Community environmental law and explores their implications for environmental governance through a case study of the island of Ireland; it focuses on the incompatible working practices and structures of Europe's emergency services, with their different languages and terminologies, and how cross-border communications between them can be standardized; and it describes the evolution of cooperation between police forces across the borders between south-east England and the adjacent countries of continental Europe. the roles of cross-border cooperation and governance in the planned enlargement of the European Union are explored through a study of a Euroregion straddling the Germany-Poland border, and studies of the multiple borders and borderlands of the Baltic Sea region and the Upper Adriatic.

Most of these contributions originated as papers (since substantially revised) which were initially discussed at an international conference held at Queen's University Belfast in September-October 2000. the conference, European Cross-Border Co-operation: Lessons for and from Ireland, brought together some 200 delegates from 12 countries-academic researchers, policy practitioners and politicians, officials from central and local governments, public services, police forces and

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