Islamikaze: Manifestations of Islamic Martyrology

Islamikaze: Manifestations of Islamic Martyrology

Islamikaze: Manifestations of Islamic Martyrology

Islamikaze: Manifestations of Islamic Martyrology

Synopsis

Raphael Israeli's overview of Islamic martyrology focuses upon the situation that has developed worldwide since the World Trade Center was destroyed. His thesis is that a sea-change has occurred in international terrorism that supersedes all other perspectives and is directly the result of Islamic influence.

Excerpt

Atrocious acts of terror have occurred during the last decades of the twentieth century, ranging from hijackings of aeroplanes, boats and other means of ground transportation, to the kidnapping of civilians for ransom or political blackmail, the blowing up of buildings, malls, restaurants, airports, aeroplanes in mid-air and trains and buses, and gun attacks on individuals and groups. Atrocities of this sort were practiced in and around the Middle East from the late 1960s onwards, but they soon spread to other areas of the world, until no continent or country was immune from them. During those years, terrorist groups, which leaned toward Marxist-prone 'revolution' of some kind or other, mushroomed in practically all parts of the world, from the Red Army in Japan, to the Symbionese Liberation Army in the United States, the Red Brigades, the Action Directe, the eta, ira, and the Bader-Meinhoff in Europe, the Shining Path in Peru and the various Palestinian rival groups of the plo, the pflp, the dflp, the Abu Nidal group and their clones and splinter groups.

Notwithstanding their different motivations, goals, scope of action, diffusion, means and targets of action, all these groups either sought to sow fear amidst their enemy and humiliate and intimidate him into surrendering to their demands; or undertook a long-term military struggle in order to weaken the enemy by guerilla warfare and constant bleeding; or tried to capture the attention of the world media in order to air their grievances and attain their redress; or tried simply to obtain by terrorist means objectives which they could not achieve in the arena of the battlefield. But although all these groups and organizations often collaborated and aided each other (for example, the Bader-Meinhoff involvement in the hijacking of the Air France plane to Entebbe in 1976, or the Japanese Red Army's role in the rampage at the Ben-Gurion Airport in 1972), they never constituted branches or arms of the same international networks. Moreover, while these acts of terrorism were often daring and required sophistication in planning and execution, they had always been the business of small groups and were calculated to extract a payment from, or to inflict pain and

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.