Elements of Visual Design in the Landscape

Elements of Visual Design in the Landscape

Elements of Visual Design in the Landscape

Elements of Visual Design in the Landscape

Synopsis

What makes a visually appealing landscape? How can the design and use of a landscape be harmonised? These are just some of the questions tackled in this refreshing approach to the subject. In Elements of Visual Design in the Landscape the author explains a range of design principles. This new edition includes revised and updated text that will link to other areas of research and disciplines such as aesthetic philosophy and psychology. A third of the photographs have been replaced with new photographs showing better and more recent examples and also reflecting landscape in a wider range of countries.

Excerpt

The professions working in the countryside-foresters, land agents, engineers-are practical people well versed in the functional side of their work but perhaps not so comfortable when it comes to dealing with visual issues. I believe that it is increasingly important to be able to discuss and use visual design principles in a rational and structured way. The catalogue of principles is not entirely new, being familiar to architects, landscape architects and urban designers, but there is a need to extend their application from built or predominantly urban environments into the wider landscape where three dimensions are more important, where the scale is bigger and where natural patterns and processes predominate over man-made ones.

The origins of this book lie in work carried out by my colleagues and myself as the first landscape architects employed by the Forestry Commission, the British forestry service. Following Duncan Campbell's lead in 1975, we have developed the means of designing man-made forests, largely in the open, semi-natural upland landscapes of Britain. We recognized early on that in order for forest managers to achieve an adequate understanding of the landscapes they are working in from a visual as well as a functional point of view, they require an appreciation of the components of the existing landscape and how they fit together to form patterns. From this follows an understanding of how an analysis of those patterns can be used in a creative way when planting or managing a forest.

I have been involved for some years now in providing training and advice on landscape design to all the professions involved in forest and countryside management, urban forest and park design. So successful has this method been that other organizations-the Countryside Commission, the Scottish Natural Heritage Agency, the Danish Forest and Nature Agency, the Northern Irish Forestry Service, the Irish Forestry Board and the US Forest Service (North West Pacific Region)-have all

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