Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance

Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance

Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance

Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance

Synopsis

Around the world, women have long been on the frontlines, protesting war and military forces. The essays in this collection, from both scholars and activists, explore the experiences of local women's groups that have developed to fight war, militarization, political domination, and patriarchy throughout the world. The writings in this collection cover a range of genres from memoir and historical accounts to critical essays. What holds the writings together is an urgency to reflect on and analyze women's activism on the frontiers - from Palestine, Sudan, Iran, Kosovo and rural India to Serbia, Croatia, Okinawa, Israel, U.S. prisons, and the racialized American South.

Excerpt

Five years after the United Nations Fourth International Conference on Women in Beijing (September 1995), I reflect on what feminists have achieved after more than four decades of organizing around issues of social and economic justice for women. I realize that civil rights are not the same as economic justice. While issues such as health, nutrition, reproductive rights, violence, misogyny, and women's poverty and labor struggles have achieved widespread global recognition, women still constitute the world's poor and the majority of the world's refugees. The so-called structural adjustment policies of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank continue to have a devastating impact on Third World women. Militarization, environmental degradation, the WTO, heterosexist state practices, religious fundamentalism, and the exploitation of poor women's labor by multinationals all pose profound challenges for feminists as we embark upon the twenty-first century.

While feminists across the globe have been variously successful, we inherit a number of challenges our mothers and grandmothers faced. But there are also new challenges as we attempt to make sense of a world indelibly marked by the failure of postcolonial capitalist and communist nation-states to provide for the social, economic, spiritual, and psychic needs of the majority of the world's population. At the beginning of the Christian millennium (year 2000, also 5760 according to the Hebrew, 4697 according to the Chinese, and 1420 according to the Arabic calendar-“just another day” according to Oren Lyons, Faithkeeper of the Onandaga Nation), globalization has come to represent the interests of corporations and the free market rather than self-determination and free-

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