Learning & Teaching with Technology: Principles and Practices

Learning & Teaching with Technology: Principles and Practices

Learning & Teaching with Technology: Principles and Practices

Learning & Teaching with Technology: Principles and Practices

Synopsis

(Originally announced with the title "E-Learning")The use of information and communications technology (ICT) in education, teaching and learning is having a profound effect on educational practice in higher education. As ICT becomes more accepted as a way of life for teachers, so the subject is moving out of the "technological closet"; however, there is still a considerable level of uncertainty, if not mystique, about what e-learning actually means, and what its impacts are in terms of real teaching and student learning. Written for educators rather than technology specialists, this crucial book for the digital age will consider just how far the e-revolution has gone, and its effects.Wide ranging and international in scope, "Learning and Teaching with Technology" looks at how far online learning has influenced -- and will influence -- teaching, and at the implications for students' learning. Much has been written about the technology of e-learning; as the technology becomes simpler, it is important for teachers to understand just how technology-enhanced teaching and learning is influencing educational practice and pedagogy, and what t

Excerpt

Those of us involved in teaching and training are facing unprecedented challenges-challenges that are both self-imposed and posed by governments and funding agencies. We are being asked, not unreasonably, to continually monitor the academic quality and teaching effectiveness of our courses, identifying and disseminating good practice, making learning more learner focused, fostering lifelong learning and independent learning-and to do this more efficiently. In this context the contribution to be made by information and communication technologies (ICT) is evident-as Tony Bates realized several years ago in his book, Technology, Open and Distance Education: 'Those countries that harness the power of the new communication and information technologies will be the powerhouses of the twenty first century' (Routledge, 1995, p 249).

Certainly, within the UK the decision to increase the proportion of 18-30-year-olds who benefit from higher education, from about 33 per cent in 2001 to 50 per cent in 2010, represents a formidable challenge. The increase in the number of learners on our courses and in our institutions will be equivalent to the creation of another 75 universities, to be achieved without a corresponding increase in funding. It is an education environment in which the characteristics of the population of learners with which we have become familiar will change; it is an environment in which the skills learners need will also change. The student body will become more heterogeneous as we attract learners from previously under-represented groups who do not have the traditional entry qualifications-but different experience and expertise. It will include increasing numbers of mature-age learners, learners who wish to study part time or flexibly and who not only have high expectations-since many will be funding themselves-but who will be demanding. It will be a student body that will need to be IT literate if it is to benefit from the opportunities available. In such a changing education and training environment it will not be possible to simply scale up previous provision-we will have to teach differently. It is a challenge currently being faced by colleagues in

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