Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: a New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis

Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: a New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis

Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: a New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis

Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: a New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis

Synopsis

This volume explores how a successful analyst can help patients to utilizes mourning for past troubles to move them forward to a lasting change for the better, emotionally, psychically and erotically.

Excerpt

The study of mourning as a life long journey of connecting, internalizing, and letting go of external others, while integrating the symbolic meaning of the relationship with these others in the internal world has pervaded my study of psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice. The profound impact of the mourning process has been with me since my early twenties when I began mourning the death of my father, whom I lost when I was ten years old. Although my own mourning process began with a bereavement, I have come to discover the day in and day out impact of object loss upon all our daily lives.

Therefore, I have found mourning related to separation individuation, object disappointment, and to the mourning of existential grief, guilt, and limits to all, to be avenues to psychic growth and to psychic integration and wholeness. Melanie Klein has been my theoretical mother in the pursuit of the journey and discovery as she was the first to intuit how mourning process was a critical clinical and developmental process, following Sigmund Freud's profound paper on mourning, “Mourning and Melancholia, ” in 1917.

I have seen how the capacity to engage in and practice this critical clinical and developmental mourning process affects us throughout our lives. Those who mourn continue to grow and those who cannot mourn become stuck in repetitive childhood enactments that sabotage and arrest their lives. I now work in many clinical modalities to help people continue their life-long development through the experience and practice of mourning. This book speaks about the in-depth mourning process in psychoanalytic treatment. However, in addition to psychoanalysis, I practice individual psychotherapy, couples therapy, and group therapy in ways that highlight, embrace, and promote the capacity to mourn. I lead an intensive mourning group and a writing group that tune into and support the full evolution of the mourning and life long growth process.

In all of my work, I have pursued themes of mourning as a developmental growth process and specify the developmental and psychodynamic issues that inhibit such mourning. I have written about blocks to mourning and about the state of developmental arrest seen in a pathological mourning state, which for women artists and writers I have described as a “demon lover complex, ” (Kavaler-Adler, 1993, 1996, 2000). All my teaching at psychoanalytic institutes, including the

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.