Counseling Techniques: Improving Relationships with Others, Ourselves, Our Families, and Our Environment

Counseling Techniques: Improving Relationships with Others, Ourselves, Our Families, and Our Environment

Counseling Techniques: Improving Relationships with Others, Ourselves, Our Families, and Our Environment

Counseling Techniques: Improving Relationships with Others, Ourselves, Our Families, and Our Environment

Synopsis

This book describes counseling techniques from a broad spectrum of theoretical approaches, and gives mental health practitioners multiple therapy options for working with clients.

Excerpt

As counseling and psychotherapy evolved, a kaleidoscope of helping initiatives emerged to meet the needs of the human condition. Each given time period had its clashes of prominent theorists and ideologies. In the 1940s, Freud and psychoanalytic theory was perhaps the initial major influence on all other formal systems of counseling and psychotherapy. Many other perspectives evolved as an extension of or rebellion against psychoanalytical principles, such as the ego psychologists or neo-Freudians of the 1950s and the convincing ideas of Carl Jung, Alfred Adler, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, Harry Stack Sullivan, Erick Erickson, and Wilhelm Reich, who felt that interpersonal aspects have a more significant influence on the development of the individual. Existential therapy evolved as the third-force in psychotherapy as an alternative to psychoanalysis and behavioral approaches, with the person-centered approach developed by Carl Rogers and Gestalt therapy of Fritz Perls.

Essentially, the 1960s was touted as the decade of person-centered therapy with the emphasis on feelings, and the importance of relationships, and focus on the congruency between the ideal and the real self. The 1970s was the decade of behaviorism and behavior therapy, focusing on measurable and observational data to monitor client growth and change. The 1980s emerged as the decade of cognition and cognitive therapy, focusing on the client's ability to change perceptions, attitudes, and thinking regarding the human condition. The 1990s rapidly emerged as what some have termed the age of dysfunction and the decade of eclecticism. As we enter the 21st century, counseling and psychotherapy will have to sustain their worth in response to the constraints of managed care. Solution-focused and brief therapy models will prevail as a means to meet the needs of the growing diversity of clients. There is also a movement toward theoretical integration of all theories. Finally, online counseling, a fairly new method for providing therapy,

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.