Integrated E-Learning: Implications for Pedagogy, Technology and Organization

Integrated E-Learning: Implications for Pedagogy, Technology and Organization

Integrated E-Learning: Implications for Pedagogy, Technology and Organization

Integrated E-Learning: Implications for Pedagogy, Technology and Organization

Synopsis

It is widely recognized that online and e-learning is no longer an exclusive approach used only in distance education and in isolation from traditional education programmes. A real difficulty facing educators and trainers is how to integrate these new learning methods and embed them in established and existing forms of learning, teaching or training. This book forms a serious, in-depth study of the subject and proposes that e-learning is not simply a matter of 'digitizing' traditional materials, but involves a new approach, which must take into account pedagogical, technological and organizational features to form a well-designed education system. A practical focus is maintained throughout, with advice on implementation and case studies drawn from the contributors' considerable experience. Integrated E-Learning is essential reading for anyone wanting to implement, design, develop or deliver e-learning or training courses.

Excerpt

We are all aware that the educational environment in which we are working is changing, and changing dramatically; it is an environment that is responding to increasing numbers of learners, mature and part-time, often within a shrinking resource allocation. It is an environment in which governments typically stress the importance of investing in people via education and training, note the power of the knowledge economy and expound the potential of the new technologies - particularly e-learning. The government push, combined with the pull from learners - the growing expectations of our learners to study at their own pace, where and when they want - is transforming conventional teaching institutions into flexible learning institutions. The massive growth in the number of distance learning courses available, and online courses available is not just occurring in educational institutions but is mirrored in industrial, commercial and public service contexts. In my own university, for example, every faculty learning and teaching plan has identified e-learning as a priority, with the projected growth in the number of staff involved in designing and delivering online components of courses set to triple over the next two years. I suspect a similar picture exists in your institution.

There is no shortage of virtual learning environments, technical fixes and enthusiasts. Furthermore, there is no shortage of content available; content that is often dumped onto the WWW and which has been termed computer supported page turning. However, where is the advice and assistance, based on models and theories, research evidence and good practice, that will help you and me design, produce and present our courses so as to make the most effective use of existing media and to provide a high quality learning experience? The answer is simple -

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.