The Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life

The Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life

The Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life

The Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life

Excerpt

This book is based on a PhD dissertation submitted to the University of Sheffield in 2001. It was in 1997 when the basic ideas sprung up in my mind. Since then, I have moved from place to place, from Japan via Scotland and England to the capital city of Wales. Throughout this long length of time, I received generous support from numerous people, whom I cannot possibly name here. Inevitably, the list below of people to whom I own thanks is not exclusive.

Firstly, I would like to thank many scholars in both Japan and Britain who provided me with invaluable academic inspiration and support, in particular, Takabatake Michitoshi, Shindō Muneyuki, Igarashi Akio, Yoshioka Tomoya, Tachi Kaoru, Hara Hiroko, Ōgai Tokuko, Roger Goodman, Georgina Waylan, Yoko Sellek, Harukiyo Hasegawa, Hugo Dobson, Richard Siddle, Hokama Komako and Christopher W. Hughes. I was also greatly helped by the comments of three anonymous reviewers.

Secondly, the staff and students of the Japanese Studies Centre, Cardiff University, provided me with stimulating opportunities in which research and teaching became a genuinely rewarding experience. In particular, I would like to thank Christopher P. Hood for help and encouragement. David Williams has also been a wonderful colleague and mentor (despite our frequent disagreements in relation to politics and ideology!); his maturity and profound experience in the field have offered me excellent 'postdoctoral' training.

A generous grant from the Japan Foundation Endowment Committee enabled me to fly to Japan, and to collect materials on the New Life Movement. Gill Goddard, Tim Kelly, Gerard Sharpling and Natalie Snodgrass went through early drafts, and provided me with invaluable linguistic assistance.

Finally, I would like to thank my two supervisors, one in Japan and one in Britain. If I had never met Kurihara Akira (presently Meiji University), I would never have dreamt of pursuing a doctoral degree, and, perhaps even more importantly, I would have never read the works of Michel Foucault. And if I had never met Glenn Hook (the School of East Asian Studies, the University of Sheffield and the series editor), I would have never completed

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